NATIONAL BUNDT CAKE DAY ~ AMARULA BUNDT CAKE

I don’t think the average bear person keeps this Cream Liqueur on hand and I wanted to be asauthenticate as possible with the ingredients. I also had to get some caramel essence as frankly, I didn’t know what it was. I wondered if I could have just used homemade caramel in its place. I’ll let you know the outcome.

THE AFRICAN LEGEND
Storytelling has always been central to African life. The Marula tree, as the source of several fascinating legends, has become a sacred and intricate part of ancient African culture. Locals have revered these trees for centuries and refer to them fondly by various names.

Because elephants travel for miles to feast on the wild fruit, locals call it ‘The Elephant Tree’. African folklore also refers to it as ‘The Marriage Tree’. Apart from making a beautifully natural wedding canopy, it’s also said to have aphrodisiac properties and features in tribal fertility rites. The ripening of the Marula fruit in summer coincides with great celebrations in many parts of Southern Africa. In Swaziland, for example, the annual Marula Festival is celebrated at the king’s royal residence, sustaining the belief that the Marula fruit is fit for kings and queens.

Like the elephants, the Marula trees are protected under South African law. They are a key part of African heritage and may not be farmed for commerce. The fruit however is sold in a variety of natural products, Amarula of course being one of them.

NATIONAL BUNDT CAKE DAY ~ AMARULA BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
This cake is moist, has a tender crumb and a unique, almost addicting flavor. I knew I had to make it from the get go. It drew me in right from the start. After all was said and done, I was not disappointed and will surely make this again, for a special occasion.
Servings
8 ~ 10 Servings
Cook Time Passive Time
50 ~ 60 Minutes 4 Hours
Servings
8 ~ 10 Servings
Cook Time Passive Time
50 ~ 60 Minutes 4 Hours
NATIONAL BUNDT CAKE DAY ~ AMARULA BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
This cake is moist, has a tender crumb and a unique, almost addicting flavor. I knew I had to make it from the get go. It drew me in right from the start. After all was said and done, I was not disappointed and will surely make this again, for a special occasion.
Servings
8 ~ 10 Servings
Cook Time Passive Time
50 ~ 60 Minutes 4 Hours
Servings
8 ~ 10 Servings
Cook Time Passive Time
50 ~ 60 Minutes 4 Hours
Ingredients
THE BUNDT CAKE
GANACHE & ASSEMBLY
Servings: Servings
Instructions
BUNDT CAKE
  1. Pre~heat oven to 350ºF and prepare a medium Bundt pan with cake release. My Homemade release has never let me down, no matter how intricate the design.
  2. Sift together, the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in a large mixing bowl. Whisk to combine.
  3. In the bowl of your stand mixer, beat together the melted butter, milk, 4 Tablespoons Amarula Liqueur, eggs and caramel essence until light and fluffy.
  4. Add dry ingredients and fold together by hand just until combined. DO NOT OVERMIX
  5. Pour batter into prepared Bundt pan, smooth on top and rap on the counter a few times to release any unwanted bubbles
  6. Bake in pre~heated oven for 50 to 60 minutes or until a finger pressed on the top of the cake springs right back up; and a tester comes out with just a few moist crumbs.
  7. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack 5 to 10 minutes
  8. Un~mold Bundt cake onto a wire rack with parchment or waxed paper underneath to catch any dripping.
  9. Using a skewer, pierce the cake in several places over the top of the cake. Heat 4 Tablespoons heavy whipping cream and 2 Tablespoons Amarula Liqueur just until warm ~ slowly pour over the cake and allow to cool completely.
GANACHE AND ASSEMBLY
  1. Once the cake has completely cooled, Combine the chopped milk chocolate, 1 Tablespoon heavy whipping cream and 2 Tablespoons Amarula Liqueur in a microwave~safe bowl. Heat in microwave on 75% power in 20 second intervals, stirring in between until completely smooth and melted. Pour over cake, followed by sprinkling the chopped pecans over the top of the cake; and dust with icing sugar, if desired.
Recipe Notes

Total  Trivia:

The United States has over 175 days related to awareness of food or drink.  None of these are federal holidays.

THE AFRICAN LEGEND
Storytelling has always been central to African life. The Marula tree, as the source of several fascinating legends, has become a sacred and intricate part of ancient African culture. Locals have revered these trees for centuries and refer to them fondly by various names.

Because elephants travel for miles to feast on the wild fruit, locals call it ‘The Elephant Tree’. African folklore also refers to it as ‘The Marriage Tree’. Apart from making a beautifully natural wedding canopy, it’s also said to have aphrodisiac properties and features in tribal fertility rites. The ripening of the Marula fruit in summer coincides with great celebrations in many parts of Southern Africa. In Swaziland, for example, the annual Marula Festival is celebrated at the king’s royal residence, sustaining the belief that the Marula fruit is fit for kings and queens.

Like the elephants, the Marula trees are protected under South African law. They are a key part of African heritage and may not be farmed for commerce. The fruit however is sold in a variety of natural products, Amarula of course being one of them.

Amarula {my new obsession} is a cream liqueur from South Africa. It is made with sugar, cream and the fruit of the African marula tree (Sclerocarya birrea) which is also locally called the Elephant tree or the Marriage Tree. It has an alcohol content of 17% by volume. It has had some success at international spirit ratings competitions, winning a gold medal at the 2006 San Francisco World Spirits Competition.

History:

Amarula was first marketed by Southern Liqueur Company of South Africa (the current trademark owners and wholly owned subsidiary of Distell Group Limited) as a liqueur in September 1989, the Amarula spirit having been launched in 1983.  It has the taste of slightly fruity caramel.

Distribution:

Amarula has had particular success in Brazil [and in Chandler, Arizona ] just kidding {not really}. Recently, Amarula has attempted to break into the American market.

Elephant-associated marketing:

Elephants enjoy eating the fruit of the marula tree. Because of the marula tree's association with elephants, the distiller has made them its symbol and supports elephant conservation efforts, co-funding the Amarula Elephant Research Programme at the University of Natal, Durban.   For marketing efforts it produces elephant-themed collectible items.

Just once a year, the Marula trees bear fruit. The elephants are drawn by the exotic scent and travel for miles to get a taste. That’s when we know it’s time to hand-harvest the ripe, yellow fruit and begin the two-year process that brings the unique taste of Amarula to the world.  The elephants get a little drunk from it and once you try it, you’ll see for yourself why they travel so far to enjoy it to the fullest.  There are videos of the elephants consuming the fruit and staggering around in a bit of drunken stupor.  None have been “carded” to my knowledge.

~ ~ ~ WIKIPEDIA {mostly} 🐝💜

* use any Cream Liqueur if Amarula is unavailable. I had to special order mine and picked it up the next day. According to the internet, it was only available by order and the one store had just a few bottles in stock kept in the back.  Now that I have tasted it, and really enjoyed it, I hope to expand my number of Amarula recipes.  Apparently, it can be used in lots of different recipes.  I’m going to do a little R & D of my own to develop a new recipe using this delightful cream liqueur.  Look for it in the upcoming weeks.

Well, got her mixed and in the oven.  This cake is quite simple to pull together and tasting the batter, I can’t wait to dive in.  As an aside, caramel essence tastes about as good as vanilla right out of the bottle.  I’m certain it will do the desired job on the final cake flavor though.

adapted. Fromwww. withablast.net

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#BUNDT BAKERS ORANGE CRUNCH BUNDT CAKE

This recipe gives you a delicate and tasty orange flavor without tasting too sweet, or a “fake” orange flavor. I have to say that even if it is my own adapted Bundt, I cannot sing enough praises for it.

#BundtBakers is a group of Bundt loving bakers who get together once a month to bake Bundts with a common ingredient or theme. You can see all our of lovely Bundts by following our Pinterest board. We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient.

Updated links for all of our past events and more information about BundtBakers, can be found on our ohref=”http://www.foodlustpeoplelove.com/p/bundtbakers.html”>home page.

It is important to thank the people who help these monthly events come together.  Probably, first and foremost is Stacey Livingston Rushton who orchestrates #BundBakers each month with the assistance of Renee Dobson and Wendy Klik; and to all the fine bakers who volunteer to host the event that changes every month.  This month, we have Felice Geoghegan of All That’s Left Are The Crumbs, who  prepared and updated  our list of bakers and their offerings; and the ever important job of choosing the theme or main ingredient.  This month, our talents have the theme of “Orange” to work with.  Sounds easy, right? Think again, it really gives us incredible choices ~ I mean, wide open.  So please check out all the bakers’  submissions to see the wide array of bunts prepared.  Im often amazed at what these bakers come up with.  Recipes that are so creative, it boggles the mind!

I, personally, also need to thank Gretchen of Gretchen’s Bakery for this beautiful, orange Bundt.  I was able to adapt it to my needs and abilities.

#BUNDT BAKERS ORANGE CRUNCH BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
A very delicate flavored orange Bundt cake that is easy to come together, but looks and tastes like you’ve been in the kitchen for hours to achieve a satisfying cake that is not too sweet and the orange enhancement is light and delicious
Servings Prep Time
10 Servings 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 ~ 50 Minutes 10 Minutes + completely cooled
Servings Prep Time
10 Servings 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 ~ 50 Minutes 10 Minutes + completely cooled
#BUNDT BAKERS ORANGE CRUNCH BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
A very delicate flavored orange Bundt cake that is easy to come together, but looks and tastes like you’ve been in the kitchen for hours to achieve a satisfying cake that is not too sweet and the orange enhancement is light and delicious
Servings Prep Time
10 Servings 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 ~ 50 Minutes 10 Minutes + completely cooled
Servings Prep Time
10 Servings 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 ~ 50 Minutes 10 Minutes + completely cooled
Ingredients
Servings: Servings
Instructions
The Bundt Cake
  1. Preheat oven to 350º F and prepare a 6 cup Bundt pan with cake release. Set aside.
  2. Cream the room temperature unsalted butter with the caster sugar until light and fluffy; about 5 minutes.
  3. Sift both flours together with the salt and baking powder.
  4. Combine eggs and extracts {Or Grand Marnier in lieu of Orange Extract) together.
  5. Slowly add the egg mixture while mixing on low to medium speed, scraping the bottom and sides of the bowl until well~incorporated
  6. Add 1/3 of the sifted flour mixture and mix just to incorporate.
  7. Combine the buttermilk with the freshly squeezed orange juice and zest and then add 1/2 of this liquid mixture to the creamed mixture.
  8. Remember to scrape down the bottom and sides of the bowl and then add 1/3 addition of the sifted flour.
  9. Add the remaining buttermilk and juice mixture then the last of the flour, mixing just until combined after each addition.
  10. Pour into the prepared Bundt pan. Tap the pan on the counter a couple of times to help the batter settle in to the nooks and crannies, and let any air bubbles out.
  11. Bake for about 45 ~ 50 minutes or until it is done. It will be springy to the touch when gently pressed in the center or when a toothpick inserted into the center comes out with a few moist crumbs. You can always use a Bundt cake thermometer to check for doneness as well.
  12. Cool slightly, about 10 minutes then turn out onto a cooling rack to cool completely.
Assembly
  1. In a small saucepan, heat the orange marmalade on low heat until melted. I used the microwave, in 10 second bursts, stirring frequently. This would be a dandy time to add in a little more Grand Marnier, no more than a teaspoon, if it suits you. The next time I make this cake, and I promise I will definitely make it again, I will add a little more Grand Marnier just to further enhance the flavor and make the marmalade a little easier to brush on. Finally, brush the melted orange marmalde mixture over the completely cooled cake and press the crushed wafer cookies into the entire outside of the cake. Enjoy. Tasty and scrumptious.
  2. Crushing the cookies and melting the marmalade are both very simple to accomplish. However, this cake does not come across as simple on your serving plate or palate.
  3. As an aside, I purchased my orange wafers online and honestly, they were a bit pricey. For cakemasters, I’m sure you would be able to find them in the cookie aisle of your favorite market.
Recipe Notes

This recipe makes a somewhat small cake (6 cup Bundt cake pan is used).  It comes together quickly and easily and I must admit, even the batter was tasty.  For some reason, we are all receiving instruction these days regarding test tasting batters that contain eggs.  I’ve grown up enjoying batters for cakes or cookies with no symptoms or any negative reaction.  If I can make it this far, I’m simply not worried about it at all.

Again, this cake is quite simple to make and offers a very nice, light orange flavor.

I used my tried and true homemade cake release and the cake literally fell right out of the pan.  The recipe and instruction can be found elsewhere on my blog.  This “stuff” is absolutely wonderful.  If you haven’t tried it yet, you’re in for a nice surprise.  The recipe is not a secret, you can find it in many, many food blogs.  Please do try it.  You have nothing to lose and cakes practically jump out of the pans.  It works great in the intricate designs found on the many Bundt cake pans that sport the designs, or your basic round pans.  The interesting designs in many Bundt cake pans add a lot of interest to the cakes being baked.  This cake release works wonders.

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#BUNDTBAKERS PEANUT BUTTER AND JAM BUNDT CAKE

Well, now that I have tasted it, all I have to say is Holy Cow, this cake is a winner. I do caution you to be careful of your baking time. You don’t want to overbake it. This little nugget would also go in my comfort foods list. One bite takes you back. It is very reminiscent of childhood, if you like peanut butter of course. Either creamy or chunky would be equally delish. This recipe produces a great tasting, easy to make dessert or lunchtime delight. Just add cold milk or, in my case, a lovely cup of tea.

#BundtBakers is a group of Bundt loving bakers who get together once a month to bake Bundts with a common ingredient or theme. You can see all our of lovely Bundts by following our Pinterest board. We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient.

Updated links for all of our past events and more information about BundtBakers, can be found on our <a href=”http://www.foodlustpeoplelove.com/p/bundtbakers.html”>home page</a>.

Well, first things first.   In order for #BundtBakers to function, some knowledgeable and helpful baker has to step up and host for each given month.  They need to choose an ingredient or theme and know enough about computers to create the list of participants and update that list once all the bakers publish their cake recipes.  It sure looks like a lot of work and I just wish I could take a turn.  I do all my postings on an IPad and you must be able to use a computer to create and update the lists.

This month, our theme is Back to School and Freeze Bundts. Our hosts are Stacey Livingston Rushton and Wendy Klik  of Food, Lust, Love.  Thank you so much ladies, I really admire you for taking on this task.

When  I learned that the theme this month was “Back  to School and Freeze”, the first thing I thought of was when my kids were little, I always laid in a big supply of peanut butter and jelly to have on hand anytime I needed a quick, last minute school lunch.

Both of my kids liked peanut butter and jelly so it was not a problem for me .  Whenever I had to make some last minute lunch or after school snack I would grab the PB & J and go to town.  Fast, easy and my kids actually ate it.

One of my granddaughters does not like peanut butter ~ sacrilege!  Every kid loves peanut butter in any form, sandwiches, morning toast, cookies and other sweets.  You name it, they would inhale it.

When my kids were young, we had a swimming pool when we lived in California, so every summer all their neighborhood friends hit the water by 10 a.m. and I was assigned lunch duty.  PB & J to the rescue.

This Bundt, would surely go over well for the kids lunches.  You could slice it up and freeze each piece separately.    When it’s time to put the lunches together, just pop a frozen slice into their lunch bag.  The frozen cake slice will travel well, and while defrosting, it would help keep the rest of the lunch fresh.

#BUNDTBAKERS. PEANUT BUTTER AND JAM BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
*This recipe was adapted from Marsha's Baking Addiction. This is a simple yet unique BUNDT cake . Thanks Marsha. The cake is really enjoyable. You can switch out the flavors, i.e. Grape jelly which was my first thought, crunchy peanut butter instead of smooth and those easy changes will give you a new favorite. It's really fast and easy to put it all together. I do suggest that you give it a try.
Servings Prep Time
12 Servings 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 ~ 50 Minutes 1 1/2 Hours
Servings Prep Time
12 Servings 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 ~ 50 Minutes 1 1/2 Hours
#BUNDTBAKERS. PEANUT BUTTER AND JAM BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
*This recipe was adapted from Marsha's Baking Addiction. This is a simple yet unique BUNDT cake . Thanks Marsha. The cake is really enjoyable. You can switch out the flavors, i.e. Grape jelly which was my first thought, crunchy peanut butter instead of smooth and those easy changes will give you a new favorite. It's really fast and easy to put it all together. I do suggest that you give it a try.
Servings Prep Time
12 Servings 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 ~ 50 Minutes 1 1/2 Hours
Servings Prep Time
12 Servings 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 ~ 50 Minutes 1 1/2 Hours
Ingredients
FOR THE BUNDT CAKE
FOR THE GLAZE
Servings: Servings
Instructions
FOR THE BUNDT CAKE
  1. Preheat oven to 350º F and prepare your Bundt pan by using cake release (homemade or purchased) and set aside.
  2. In a large bowl, Sift together the cake flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt, set aside.
  3. In your stand mixer, Whisk the eggs until blended. Add the caster sugar and whisk until combined and gets light and fluffy.
  4. Add the vanilla, melted butter, Greek yogurt, and peanut butter and whisk until well combined, scraping down the sides of the bowl as needed. Remove the bowl of your stand mixer and fold in the dry ingredients by hand until well blended.
  5. Pour half the mixture into the prepared Bundt pan. Use your spatula and make a small "trench" down the middle of the cake batter, to ready it for the jam. Spoon the jam over the batter, without touching the sides of the pan and top with remaining batter.
  6. Bake for 45 ~ 55 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out with a few moist crumbs, or use your Bundt cake thermometer.
  7. Allow cake to cool in the pan for 10 minutes before inverting the cake onto a wire rack to cool completely.
FOR THE GLAZE
  1. Sift confectioners sugar; whisk together the sifted icing (confectioners) sugar, vanilla and milk until smooth. Add more milk or cream if too thick or icing sugar if too thin, as needed, 1 teaspoon at a time.
  2. Drizzle over completely cooled cake and place your cake on your serving plate or stand to serve.
  3. Slice up the cake into individual servings, place in a seal top bag and freeze. When it's time to put lunches together, just pop a slice right into their lunch bag. The cake will defrost during the morning and be ready to enjoy for dessert.
Recipe Notes

Notes :  If you don't have cake flour in your pantry, Relax,  you can make your own.  Just measure out  3 cups of plain all purpose flour, remove 6 tablespoons, and replace with 6 tablespoons of corn flour or corn starch and sift three times.  Yes, 3 times.

Peanut butter is a food paste or spread made from ground dry roasted peanuts. It often contains additional ingredients that modify the taste or texture, such as salt, sweeteners or emulsifiers. Peanut butter is popular in many countries. The United States is a leading exporter of peanut butter and itself consumes $800 million of peanut butter annually.

Peanut butter is served as a spread on bread, toast or crackers, and used to make sandwiches (notably the peanut butter and jelly sandwich). It is also used in a number of confections and packaged foods, such as Reese's Peanut Butter Cups (made of chocolate-coated peanut butter), candy bars (e.g., peanut butter in  Snickers) and peanut-flavoured granola bars. Comparable preparations are made by grinding other nuts. A variety of other nut butters are also sold, such as cashew butter and almond butter.

The use of peanuts dates to the Aztecs and Incas, and peanut paste may have been used by the Aztecs as a toothache remedy in the first century of the Common Era.

Marcellus Gilmore Edson (1849 – 1940) of Montreal, Canada obtained a patent for peanut butter in 1884. Edson's cooled product had "a consistency like that of butter, lard, or ointment" according to his patent application which described a process of milling roasted peanuts until the peanuts reached "a fluid or semi-fluid state". He mixed sugar into the paste to harden its consistency.  George Bayle, a businessperson from St. Louis produced and sold peanut butter in the form of a snack food in 1894.

John Harvey Kellogg, known for his line of prepared breakfast cereals, was issued a patent for a "Process of Producing Alimentary Products" in 1898, and used peanuts, although he boiled the peanuts rather than roasting them.  Kellogg's Western Health Reform Institute served peanut butter to patients because they needed a food that contained a lot of protein, yet which could be eaten without chewing.  At first, peanut butter was a food for wealthy people.  Initially, it  was a product served at expensive health care institutes.

Early peanut-butter-making machines were developed by Joseph Lambert, who had worked at John Harvey Kellogg's Battle Creek Sanitarium, and Dr. Ambrose Straub who obtained a patent for a peanut-butter-making machine in 1903.  "In 1922, chemist Joseph Rosefield invented a process for making smooth peanut butter that kept the oil from separating by using partially hydrogenated oil"; Rosefield "...licensed his invention to the company that created Peter Pan peanut butter" in 1928 and in "...1932 he began producing his own peanut butter under the name Skippy".  Under the Skippy brand, Rosefield developed a new method of churning creamy peanut butter, giving it a smoother consistency. He also mixed fragments of peanut into peanut butter, creating the first "chunky"-style peanut butter.  In 1955, Procter & Gamble launched a peanut butter named Jif {my preference},  which was sweeter than other brands, due to the use of "sugar and molasses" in its recipe.

As the US National Peanut Board confirms, "Contrary to popular belief, George Washington Carver did not invent peanut butter."  Carver was given credit in popular folklore for many inventions that did not come out of his lab. By the time Carver published his document about peanuts, entitled "How to Grow the Peanut and 105 Ways of Preparing it For Human Consumption" in 1916, many methods of preparation of peanut butter had been developed or patented by various pharmacists, doctors and food scientists working in the US and Canada.

January 24 is National Peanut Butter Day in the United States.  In my opinion, it should be a National Holiday.

~ ~ ~ Wikipedia ~  ~  ~

#BundtBakers is a group of Bundt loving bakers who get together once a month to bake Bundts with a common ingredient or theme. We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme or ingredient.

You can see all our of lovely Bundts by following our Pinterest board. Updated links for all of our past events and more information about #BundtBakers, can be found on our home page.

BundtBakers

All I know is, I still keep it on hand in my pantry for both Mr. B and myself.  The standard peanut butter cookie is my long time favorite {especially if adding a Hershey's chocolate kiss}.  There are, however, several peanut butter~based cookies that regularly find their way into my shopping cart.  🐝💜

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#BUNDT BAKERS STRAWBERRY BUNDT CAKE WITH WHITE CHOCOLATE GANACHE

Once I saw this cake, I knew I had to make it. It fit the theme, looks fabulous and I’m salivating just thinking about any leftover ganache, which will go right in my tummy. Hope I don’t increase the recipe by much,{lol}. This cake does contain a lot of ingredients, some a little pricey like the white and dark chocolate. If it seems to be too much of a task to make, remember it can be accomplished over a couple of days. If I can do it, I’m sure you will too. Plus, it really IS worth the effort.

Tammy Pappas of Living the Gourmet is the genius who chose and  declared our theme for August as strawberries, the epitome of summer delicious bounty.   Great and fun theme, yeah? Thanks for hosting this month Tammy, you brought imagination and interest with our current theme.

Also, big thanks to Alexandra of Bright~Eyed Baker for this lovely strawberry bundt recipe.  While searching for a good bundt with strawberries to fulfill our August theme, most strawberry cake recipes started out with some flavored box cake mix, enhancing further flavor with strawberry gelatin.  Yuck!.  Then I found this little beauty and needed to look no further;  I could adapt it for my needs and abilities.

It’s not only fabulous to look at, the cake itself is strictly from scratch, including puréed, roasted strawberries.  The flavor is out of this world.  I can hardly wait to finish it and get several good pictures before diving in.  I’ll share with my 90 year old mother~in~law who is sadly fading.  The family cannot get her to eat much, she’s down to skin and bones.  The one thing she gobbles up is baked goods so yes, I’ll share with her but right now I’m feeling kind of stingy about the whole “sharing thing”.  I should feel guilty about that but I’m not.  At this point, all I’ve been able to sample is the mixed cake batter left behind in the bowl after filling my bundt pan.  Based on that alone, most of it stays with me. {lol}

As an aside, my homemade cake release (posted earlier on my site) works very well.  My Bundt pan this month is crazy with nooks and crannies and the cake just popped right out.  Try it, you’ll see.

Lucky for me, this cake can be done in sections.  Today, the cake, tomorrow, the dipped strawberries and ganache.  I’m looking forward to sampling any left~overs in those mixing bowls.

#BUNDT BAKERS STRAWBERRY BUNDT CAKE WITH WHITE CHOCOLATE GANACHE
Print Recipe
This light, tender and moist Bundt cake has a vibrant taste of strawberries, matched with the perfect amount of sweetness. It easily stands alone but is made even more special with creamy white chocolate glaze and chocolate ~covered strawberries, our theme this month, "strawberries". It makes a beautiful presentation. It's so beautiful and so delicious it's suitable for any special event or holiday.
Servings Prep Time
12 Servings 1 Hour
Cook Time
50 Minutes
Servings Prep Time
12 Servings 1 Hour
Cook Time
50 Minutes
#BUNDT BAKERS STRAWBERRY BUNDT CAKE WITH WHITE CHOCOLATE GANACHE
Print Recipe
This light, tender and moist Bundt cake has a vibrant taste of strawberries, matched with the perfect amount of sweetness. It easily stands alone but is made even more special with creamy white chocolate glaze and chocolate ~covered strawberries, our theme this month, "strawberries". It makes a beautiful presentation. It's so beautiful and so delicious it's suitable for any special event or holiday.
Servings Prep Time
12 Servings 1 Hour
Cook Time
50 Minutes
Servings Prep Time
12 Servings 1 Hour
Cook Time
50 Minutes
Ingredients
Strawberry Bundt cake
White Chocolate Ganache
Chocolate~covered Strawberries with White Chocolate Drizzle
Servings: Servings
Instructions
Strawberry Bundt Cake
  1. Preheat oven to 375º F, prepare a 12 Cup Bundt pan with cake release {homemade or Pam for Baking.} Set Aside. Make sure to well~coat all the nooks and crannies of the pan.
  2. Place the chopped strawberries in an 11" X 7" baking dish and sprinkle 1 1/2 Tablespoons granulated sugar on top. Roast in the pre~heated oven for about 15 minutes, then set aside for 15 Minutes to cool
  3. Reduce the oven temperature to 325º F
  4. In a large bowl, whisk flour, baking powder, salt, and baking soda together
  5. In the bowl of a stand mixer, cream together the butter, vanilla sugar, and brown sugar until mixture is even in color and texture and the color has lightened a little. One at a time, add the eggs and the egg yolk, beating between each addition until well combined, scraping down mixing bowl as needed.
  6. In a blender, purée the cooled strawberries with yogurt until smooth. Add to the batter in the stand mixer along with the vanilla extract and red food coloring.
  7. Beat on low speed until the batter is even in color and everything is well~combined, scraping down the bottom and sides of the bowl to ensure everything is incorporated.
  8. Sift the dry ingredients into the wet mixture and fold in well with a spatula until just combined. DO NOT OVERMIX! I was so careful not to overmix the batter, I actually under beat it a smidge.
  9. Pour the batter into the greased Bundt pan, spreading it out to fill every crevice of the pan and smooth it out on top.
  10. Rap the pan firmly on the counter to eliminate any trapped air bubbles.
  11. Bake in the preheated oven for 50 to 53 minutes until a toothpick into the center of the cake comes out "almost" clean. The toothpick, or your cake thermometer should still have just a tiny bit of crumb attached, being careful not to overbake it.
  12. Cool in the pan set on a wire rack for about 15 minutes. Then, rap the pan on the counter a few times to loosen the cake.
  13. Place the cooling rack upside~down over the pan, and turn the cake out onto the rack.
  14. Cover the top and sides with plastic wrap, and allow the cake to let cool completely until it is no longer warm to the touch.
  15. Wrap tightly with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature until it is ready to decorate.
  16. Make the chocolate~covered strawberries and plan out how you will decoratively place them on the cake before making the ganache glaze. Recipe follows:
Chocolate~covered Strawberries with White Chocolate Drizzle
  1. Rinse and dry strawberries. Take care that they are COMPLETELY dry before continuing
  2. If your strawberry stems don't look fresh, you can choose to cut them off. Cut off just enough to remove any unsightly and/or inedible area. Take care that you do not cut into the juicy part of the berries. Dry the cut area thoroughly by dabbing with a paper towel.
  3. Line a large tray with parchment paper. Melt the bittersweet chocolate in a microwave~safe bowl in 30 second intervals, gently stirring between intervals, until smooth. A container that is more tall than wide, like a Pyrex liquid measuring cup, works well.
  4. For strawberries with stems, dip each strawberry into the semi~sweet chocolate, tip~side,down, holding the strawberry stem.
  5. For strawberries without stems, dip into chocolate stem~side down, holding by the tip. Using this method, it helps to use a spoon with your free hand to lift the strawberry back out of the chocolate. Lift out and let the excess drip off.
  6. Place dipped strawberries on the parchment lined tray to set up. Once set, use a knife to trim off any chocolate that pooled around the strawberries. I refrigerated my dipped strawberries before cutting away the excess at the bottom. Don't do that. Keep the dipped berries at room temperature until assembly.
  7. On a side~note, chocolate~covered strawberries are really best served the same day they are made, Be sure to use a good quality chocolate, its the real star In this recipe and will definitely stand out.
  8. When dipping the strawberries in chocolate, the chocolate level will eventually lower to a point where you'll need to use a spoon or chocolate candy spoon to scoop it up the sides of the strawberry. Also, if the melted chocolate gets too thick and isn't applying smoothly, place it back in the microwave for 5 second intervals, stirring it between until melted and smooth again.
White Chocolate Ganache
  1. Place the white chocolate in a microwave-safe bowl. In a separate, microwave-safe container, microwave the heavy cream for 20-30 seconds, just until it starts to boil. Pour the cream over the white chocolate, making sure that most of the white chocolate is covered. Let sit for 5 minutes. Then, stir in a gentle, circular motion until the white chocolate has melted completely and the mixture is smooth. If needed, microwave for another 10 seconds at a time, stirring gently between intervals, until smooth. If a few small bits of chocolate aren’t melting or you happen to get air bubbles in the ganache, strain it through a sieve before continuing. The ganache should be very thick, so that it falls in a slow stream from the bowl. If needed, chill it in the fridge briefly, about 5-10 minutes, and then stir again until smooth
Assembly
  1. Drizzle the ganache over the bundt cake, pouring over the top and letting it pool slowly down the sides. Arrange the strawberries on top, and let the ganache set. Serve cake the day it is assembled. Any leftovers should be covered tightly in plastic wrap and kept in the refrigerator. I've read that placing a piece of sliced bread over the cut ends will help it stay fresh. Be sure to put plastic wrap over cut edges well to keep the cake moist. Enjoy!
  2. This is the piece I set aside for my mother-in-law. She was already in bed when Mr. B took it over to her. I'm waiting for my critique in the morning.
Recipe Notes

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Drizzle the ganache over the bundt cake, pouring over the top and letting it pool slowly down the sides. Arrange the strawberries on top, and let the ganache set.

NOTES

Make sure to find the most attractive, fresh, firm strawberries to use for dipping and decorating.

Use the best quality white chocolate that you can afford for this recipe, the chocolate really is a focal point in this cake.  If you can find white chocolate made specifically for melting, that’s probably an easier way to go.

Remember,  this  cake can be made in "sections".  I baked the cake one day, let it cool completely and wrapped tightly in plastic and kept  it at room temperature until putting it all together.  The next day, I dipped the strawberries, made the white Chocolate Ganache and assembled shortly before serving.  It was well received.

If you aren’t sure whether your ganache is at the perfect consistency for drizzling on the cake, you can test it by pouring a little bit on and seeing how it flows down the side. If it's too liquid, you can chill the ganache in the fridge for about 5 minutes.  If you end up getting it a little too thick, microwave it for 5-10 seconds, just until it’s reached the right consistency.  It should drip down the sides of the cake easily, but not too fast.

Decorate with your beautiful dipped  strawberries and fight over who gets the biggest piece.  🐝💜

Strawberries

The garden strawberry (or simply strawberry; Fragaria × ananassa) is a widely grown hybrid species of the genus Fragaria, collectively known as the strawberry.   It is cultivated worldwide for its fruit. The fruit is widely appreciated for its characteristic aroma, bright red color, juicy texture, and sweetness. It is consumed in large quantities, either fresh or in such prepared foods as preserves, juice, pies, ice creams, milkshakes, and chocolates. Artificial strawberry flavorings and aromas are also widely used in many products like lip gloss, candy, hand sanitizers, perfume, and many others.

The garden strawberry was first bred in Brittany, France, in the 1750s via a cross of Fragaria virginiana from eastern North America and Fragaria chiloensis, which was brought from Chile by Amédée-François Frézier in 1714.Cultivars of Fragaria × ananassa have replaced, in commercial production, the woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca), which was the first strawberry species cultivated in the early 17th century.

The strawberry is not, from a botanical point of view, a berry. Technically, it is an aggregate accessory fruit, meaning that the fleshy part is derived not from the plant's ovaries but from the receptacle that holds the ovaries. Each apparent "seed" (achene) on the outside of the fruit is actually one of the ovaries of the flower, with a seed inside it.

Fresh summer strawberries are one of the most popular, refreshing, and healthy treats on the planet. They also appear to carry a number of health benefits.

Today, there are over 600 varieties of strawberries. The sweet, slightly tart berries rank among the top 10 fruits and vegetables for antioxidant content.

The benefits of consuming fruits and vegetables of all kinds, including strawberries, are varied. As plant food consumption goes up, the risk of heart disease, diabetes, and cancer goes down.

A high intake of fruits and vegetables is also associated with healthy skin and hair, increased energy, and lower weight. Increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables significantly decreases the risk of obesity and overall mortality.

Wikipedia

BundtBakers is a group of Bundt loving bakers who get together once a month to bake Bundts with a common ingredient or theme. You can see all our of lovely Bundts by following our Pinterest board. We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient.

Updated links for all of our past events and more information about BundtBakers, can be found on our <a href="http://www.foodlustpeoplelove.com/p/bundtbakers.html">home page</a>.

 

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#BUNDT BAKERS BOSTON CREAM~FILLED BUNDT CAKE ** double the Sponge recipe

I consider this recipe a bit labor intensive but after tasting the completed cake, it’s worth the effort. After sampling, It is definitely one of my favorites. But in all honesty, I won’t be turning this out unless it’s for a special occasion. The cake is, in my opinion, simply fabulous. I suggest doubling the cake recipe to create a larger cake.

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First and foremost, a great big thank you hug for this fun and tasty theme,  “Filled Bundt Cakes”.   This months recipes are brought to you by           Christina Lopez Vera of Bizcocheando and Patricia at Pattys Cake.           And, thanks especially for the translation.

It didn’t take me long to figure out what cake to bake.  I just went straight to the horse’s mouth, Mr. Bee, he knew right off what he wanted this month and I like to include his favorites for him.  This Boston Creme~Filled Bundt Cake will definitely be added to his favorites list.  I’m already sampling that chocolate drizzle in my dreams.

Now, Boston Cream Pie is not a difficult cake to bake but turning it into a Bundt took a little research and reading potential recipes. This recipe is adapted from several recipes, including  “Unsophisticook.com and The Cake Book”.   Great start!   Now if you know anything about me {and if you are following me, you would already know a few of my simple rules}.  If not, please come join me.  I’m not a proliferate Pinner but what I lack in numbers of pins, I make up for it with enthusiastic fervor.   My homemade recipes are really very good.

I prefer baking from scratch.  Yes, I have used boxed cakes plenty of times, but  I consider #Bundt Bakers more than worthy of offering a scratch- baked Bundt as opposed to cake mix. I really wanted to make it special because my daughter arrives on Tuesday along with my two granddaughters.  Two weeks of Heaven in my house…….

I much prefer heavy whipping cream to any “fake” whipped cream product.    So, {a} heavy whipping cream instead of cool whip}; { b} No instant pudding, just a perfect custard, using Bird’s custard mix or your own favorite filling or use the one provided in this recipe.  It’s fast, easy and tastes absolutely great;  and [c} Homemade rather than “store-bought cake mix”.  There is a big  difference between the pre-made in all of my three “almost-scratch” choices.

This hot milk cake is the perfect recipe for this yummy morsel.  This recipe makes up a small cake and next time,  ** I will definitely double the recipe.  Now, add the homemade Custard and finishing touch of irresistible chocolate and I’m your girl.

 

 

 

#BUNDT BAKERS BOSTON CREAM~FILLED BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
This recipe requires some advance planning, as the cake has to cool completely before it is filled and frosted. This hot milk cake is the perfect recipe for this yummy morsel. This recipe makes up a small cake and next time, I will definitely double the recipe. Now, add the homemade Custard and finishing touch of irresistible chocolate and I'm your girl.
Servings Prep Time
6 Servings 30 ~ 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20~25 Minutes 1 ~ 2 hours Set up
Servings Prep Time
6 Servings 30 ~ 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20~25 Minutes 1 ~ 2 hours Set up
#BUNDT BAKERS BOSTON CREAM~FILLED BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
This recipe requires some advance planning, as the cake has to cool completely before it is filled and frosted. This hot milk cake is the perfect recipe for this yummy morsel. This recipe makes up a small cake and next time, I will definitely double the recipe. Now, add the homemade Custard and finishing touch of irresistible chocolate and I'm your girl.
Servings Prep Time
6 Servings 30 ~ 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20~25 Minutes 1 ~ 2 hours Set up
Servings Prep Time
6 Servings 30 ~ 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20~25 Minutes 1 ~ 2 hours Set up
Ingredients
Hot Milk Sponge Cake
Vanilla Custard Filling
Chocolate Ganache Drizzle
Servings: Servings
Instructions
Hot Milk Sponge Cake
  1. Preheat oven to 350º degrees and prepare baking pan with homemade cake release, or Bakers Joy
  2. Sift the cake flour, baking powder and salt twice. Set aside. In a small saucepan, combine the milk, and butter and heat over medium heat just until the butter is melted. Remove the pan from heat and set aside.
  3. Using the whisk attachment on your stand mixer, beat the eggs at high speed until blended. About 1 minute.
  4. Gradually add in granulated sugar and vanilla extract and beat until pale and tripled in volume, about 6 minutes.
  5. Sift 1/3 cup of flour mixture over the egg mixture and GENTLY fold in with a rubber spatula. Repeat with the remaining flour in two more additions. Do not over~fold or you will deflate the mixture.
  6. Reheat the milk mixture to just under a boil. Add it all at once to the egg mixture and gently fold it in.
  7. Pour the combined mixture into a prepared Bundt cake pan, and gently tap the pan on on the counter, several times, to release any large air bubbles
  8. Bake the cake on the lowest rack of the oven at 350º degrees for approximately 20 to 25 minutes until it springs back when lightly touched and a cake tester inserted into the center comes out clean. Cool the cake in the pan on a wire rack for 10 minutes.
  9. Remove from the Bundt pan and reinvert the cake so it is right side up to finish cooling on a wire rack.
  10. I froze my cake for easier handling. After the cake is about half~way thawed, cut the cake horizontally. While you are waiting for the cake to finish defrosting, it's a dandy time to make the Custard.
  11. When the cake is mostly thawed, use a small paring knife and a teaspoon to dig a good sized trench in the top and bottom cake layers to give you more filling space.
Vanilla Custard Filling
  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together the egg yolks, sugar and the cornstarch, set aside
  2. In a medium sauce pan, bring the milk to a gentle boil. Remove the pan from the heat and whisk about 1/3 cup of the hot milk into the yolk mixture. Return the entire mixture to the sauce pan, place over medium high heat and bring to a boil, whisking constantly for one minute. Remove the pan from the heat and scrape the bottom of the pan with a spatula and whisk until smooth. Whisk in the butter until completely melted .
  3. Immediately strain the custard through a fine mesh sieve into a medium bowl . Whisk in the vanilla extract. Cover the surface of the custard with plastic wrap and let cool to room temperature then refrigerate for two hours or until well chilled.
  4. Just before assembling the cake, transfer the custard filling to the bowl of your stand mixer. Add 1/4 cup heavy whipping cream and using the whisk attachment on your mixer beat the mixture at high speed until it is light and forms into soft peaks about one minute.
Chocolate Drizzle
  1. In a small sauce pan, (or in the microwave). bring the cream to a boil. Remove from the heat and add the chopped chocolate to the pan. Stir until the chocolate is completely melted and the glaze is smooth. Stir in the vanilla extract. Transfer the glaze to a small bowl , cover the surface of the glaze with a piece of plastic wrap and let cool for about 10 minutes before using.
Assembling the cake
  1. I froze my cake, well-wrapped in plastic wrap, to allow it to firm up before I attempted to cut into it.
  2. Allow it to come to almost room temperature, but still a bit firm. Using a long serrated knife, cut the cake horizontally in half to make two layers.
  3. Place the bottom half of the cake cut side up on a serving plate. Using a small paring knife and a teaspoon carve around the inside edges of the cake leaving a border of cake and scrape out a little bit of the cake with your teaspoon. Make a nice "trench" on both halves to allow for a generous portion of custard.
  4. Now, spread the filling onto the bottom layer and using a small offset spatula spread it into an even layer in the trench that you've dug in the bottom half. Repeat this technique to the cut side of the top layer to allow for plenty of Custard filling.
  5. Add more custard to the small trench you made with a teaspoon and very carefully add the filled top to the filled bottom layer on your serving dish.
Glaze the cake
  1. Pour the warm glaze over the top of the cake allowing some of it to artisticly drizzle down the sides serve the cake immediately or refrigerate.
  2. Store in refrigerator in a covered container for up to a day before serving. Bring to room temperature before serving.
  3. Note: the Custard can be made ahead of time stored carefully with plastic wrap form fitted over the top of the custard.
  4. Note: that Hot Milk Sponge can be made a day or two before serving. This will allow time for the cake to firm up in the freezer for easier assembly.
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#BUNDTBAKERS HARVEY WALLBANGER BUNDT CAKE

This cake goes together lickety-split, its really simple and comes together nicely. The batter has a definite tang which I attributed to the alcohol. I thought that would disappear after baking, but was still a little aftertaste that I think comes from the vodka. If I make it again, I’ll leave the vodka out. I think you could make it without any alcohol. Just add a bit more vanilla and replace the booze with fresh squeezed orange juice and some orange extract. It’s tasty enough using the original recipe but since I’m not able to drink any alcohol because of some medication I’m taking, I think that affected the flavor for me. All in all, a nice Bundt.

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First and foremost, a great big thank you to Patricia at pattyscake-pbb.blogspot.com for this wonderful theme.  Your favorite cocktail morphing to a Bundt cake.  Ingenious.  When you have  a minute, check out her blog.  She offers a nice assortment of recipes.  Thanks also to King Arthur Flour where I found this recipe.  I’ve been using King Arthur products for years and, to date, have never been disappointed.

The first time I ever ordered a Harvey Wallbanger, I was quite young and was anxious just to see the look on the waitress’s face ~ she couldn’t have been more bored by it all.  So, at the very least, I got a great tasting drink on my wedding night.  I was only 19 at the time but she served me anyway and in fact, she made a cute “love bug” for us out of  things at the bar.

Any cake recipe works best if the butter, liquid and eggs are all at room temperature before they’re combined. Putting cold eggs into soft butter equals a curdled mess. To bring everything to room temperature right out of the frige, place the eggs in a bowl, and cover with the warmest tap water you can run over your hand. Let them sit while you measure out the dry ingredients and you’ll be all set.  You can also do this with sticks of butter, still in their wrappers, in lukewarm water. It really works. Just pat the sticks dry with a paper towel before you unwrap them and put them in the mixing bowl.  You can also heat a glass under hot water, then put the warmed glass over the stick of butter and it will become room temperature within a few minutes.

In a large mixing bowl, beat together the sugar, butter and salt until fluffy. Beat in the oil, then the vanilla and eggs, one at a time, beating until each egg completely disappears before adding the next one.

When it’s time to make the glaze, whisk some fresh squeezed orange juice and the booze together until smooth. The glaze will seem a little thick, but that’s okay, that’s how it should be.

Using a pastry brush, “paint” the cake while it’s still lukewarm. The heat from the cake will help the glaze travel over the cake and make a nice, smooth finish.

Enjoying this cake will undoubtedly bring back fond memories for all the baby boomers out there.

 

#BUNDTBAKERS HARVEY WALLBANGER BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
This Bundt has a very nice texture and the basic flavor can be recognized by many baby boomers. It's very simple to pull together, including adding the glaze. You could easily whip this up in the afternoon and enjoy the finished product after dinner. "Easy" is always welcome at my house.
Servings Prep Time
20 Servings 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 ~ 60 Minutes 30 ~ 45 Minutes
Servings Prep Time
20 Servings 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 ~ 60 Minutes 30 ~ 45 Minutes
#BUNDTBAKERS HARVEY WALLBANGER BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
This Bundt has a very nice texture and the basic flavor can be recognized by many baby boomers. It's very simple to pull together, including adding the glaze. You could easily whip this up in the afternoon and enjoy the finished product after dinner. "Easy" is always welcome at my house.
Servings Prep Time
20 Servings 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 ~ 60 Minutes 30 ~ 45 Minutes
Servings Prep Time
20 Servings 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 ~ 60 Minutes 30 ~ 45 Minutes
Ingredients
The Bundt Cake
GLAZE
Servings: Servings
Instructions
For the cake
  1. Preheat your oven to 350º F. Prepare a 9-cup bundt pan with homemade cake release or grease and flour pan, set aside.
  2. Beat together sugar, butter and salt in your stand mixer until fluffy.
  3. Beat in oil, then the vanilla and eggs, one at a time, beating until each egg disappears before adding the next one. Scrape the sides and bottom of the mixing bowl as you go along.
  4. In a measuring cup, stir together the orange juice, Galliano, Vodka and orange zest.
  5. In a separate mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, cornstarch and baking powder.
  6. Add 1/3 of this mixture to the stand mixer, mixing until it disappears. Add 1/2 of the liquid and beat in. Remember to scrape the bowl, then add another third of the dry ingredients and mix in. Add the remaining liquid, mix, and scrape the bowl.
  7. Add the remaining dry ingredients and mix until combined. Scrape the bowl and mix for one minute more.
  8. Transfer the batter to the prepared pan and bang a few times on the counter to help settle the batter in. Smooth out the top.
  9. Bake 45 to 50 minutes. Remove from oven and place on a rack to cool for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes, turn the cake out of the pan and onto a serving plate.
To make the glaze
  1. Combine all of the ingredients and brush over the cake while it is still lukewarm.
  2. Store, covered, on the counter for 5 days or freeze for up to 3 months.
Recipe Notes

The Harvey Wallbanger is a mixed drink made with Vodka, Galliano, and orange juice.  It is served on the rocks' poured over ice and garnished with an orange slice and a "perfect" maraschino cherry.  It is served in a highball glass, the taller the better. It consists of 3 parts Vodka, 1 part Galliano and 6 parts fresh orange juice.  The preparation is simple, stir the
Vodka and orange juice with ice in the glass, then float the Galliano on top. Garnish and serve.
* Harvey Wallbanger recipe at International Bartenders Association

The Harvey Wallbanger appears in literature as early as 1971. The cocktail is reputed to have been invented in 1952 by three-time world champion mixologist Donato "Duke" Antone, and named by Antone after a surfer frequenting Antone's Blackwatch Bar in Los Angeles. However, recent research by culinary historians casts doubt on this theory. Robert Simonson goes so far as to say that "no sane person ever believed that story."   Simonson emphasizes the lack of a historical record for any Blackwatch Bar, and indicates that, in fact, Antone lived in Hartford, Connecticut, rather than Los Angeles during the relevant period.

Other historians such as David Wondrich emphasize the role of McKesson Imports Company and its marketing team for developing the drink, confirming among other things that the company commissioned a graphic artist to develop a "Harvey Wallbanger" sandal-clad surfer mascot in the late 1960s.  It is known that McKesson executive George Bednar was instrumental in promoting the drink as a means of selling its component Galliano liqueur, and Bednar claimed to have penned a popular tagline for the drink: "Harvey Wallbanger is the name. And It can be made!". 💜

~Wikipedia

ps.  Thanks for your patience while I muddle along completing my website.  Clearly, I don't know how to do it so I just keep trying.  Urrrggghhh.

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#BundtBakers ~ CZECH POPPYSEED CROWN COFFEE CAKE ~ Bàbovka or Màku Kàvovˋy Dort Recept

Poppy seeds are a favorite with Slavic people. They find their way into both sweet and savory recipes as is this lovely Czech poppyseed Crown coffee cake or b’abovka which translates to “grandmother” and thus is similar to Polish Babkas. Maku K`avovk`y Dort translates directly to “poppyseed coffee cake”. The reference to this being a “crown” coffee cake comes from its shape because of the baking pan used.

This basic sweet yeast-raised dough is excellent as a base for any number of coffee cakes, cinnamon rolls, and other pastries.

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You can see all our of lovely Bundts by following our Pinterest board. Updated links for all of our past events and more information about #BundtBakers, can be found on our home page.
And don’t forget to take a peek at what other talented bakers have baked this month:
<ul>

The minute I saw this coffee cake, I just had to make it and enjoy at least a few bites.  I adore poppyseeds!  Whether in a sweet or savory recipe, I’m on board.  A special note of appreciation to Felice Geoghegan of That’s Left Are The Crumbs for this unique theme.  I didn’t realize how many cakes use yeast in the recipe.  It was a lot of fun researching this theme and finding the perfect recipe.  I also want to thank The Spruce for this unique and yummy recipe.  I changed it a bit and didn’t include the raisins as Mr. B doesn’t like them.  I do like them and I think this would be tastier including the raisins, more orange zest and adding a teaspoon of Vanilla and chopped pecans.  Never enough nuts for me.

This was indeed the easiest cake I’ve made since joining BundtBakers.  The main thing to remember is the rising times required in parts of the recipe.  Other than that, this coffee cake is really straightforward.   I did not have the “perfect” baking pan but muddled through with the Bundt pan that would most resemble a crown.

This recipe  makes a large cake and that has a nice texture, good flavor and a small piece satisfies.

#BundtBakers ~ CZECH POPPYSEED CROWN COFFEE CAKE ~ Bàbovka or Màku Kàvovˋy Dort Recept
Print Recipe
This coffee cake is a snap to make. It's only slightly sweet, the poppyseeds are an interesting addition and it bakes up beautifully. I think I should have used a larger pan but it still turned out well. This will be fabulous tomorrow morning along side a big cup of java.
Servings Prep Time
12 servings 2+ Hours
Cook Time Passive Time
45~60 Minutes 20 Minutes
Servings Prep Time
12 servings 2+ Hours
Cook Time Passive Time
45~60 Minutes 20 Minutes
#BundtBakers ~ CZECH POPPYSEED CROWN COFFEE CAKE ~ Bàbovka or Màku Kàvovˋy Dort Recept
Print Recipe
This coffee cake is a snap to make. It's only slightly sweet, the poppyseeds are an interesting addition and it bakes up beautifully. I think I should have used a larger pan but it still turned out well. This will be fabulous tomorrow morning along side a big cup of java.
Servings Prep Time
12 servings 2+ Hours
Cook Time Passive Time
45~60 Minutes 20 Minutes
Servings Prep Time
12 servings 2+ Hours
Cook Time Passive Time
45~60 Minutes 20 Minutes
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl or stand mixer, combine 1 1/2 cups flour, sugar, salt and yeast.
  2. Heat milk and butter until warm and butter melts.
  3. Add to dry ingredients and beat with the paddle attachment of a stand mixer at low speed until blended.
  4. Increase speed to medium and beat two minutes. Stir in remaining flour or just enough to make a stiff dough.
  5. Either turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead by hand until smooth and elastic, or; switch to dough hook and knead until smooth and elastic and cleans the sides of the bowl, about 5 to 8 minutes. I chose the dough hook method and and it really "was a piece of cake".
  6. Place in greased bowl, cover with greased plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 hour.
  7. Prepare 12 cup Bundt pan or 10 cup kugelhopf pan and set aside. Use your own cake release or spray on cake release.
  8. Punch down dough. Roll out on a lightly floured surface to an 8 X 15 inch rectangle.
  9. Spread evenly with poppyseed filling to within 1/2 inch of sides all the way around. Sprinkle evenly with raisins and orange zest. I think a bit more zest would really add to the overall flavor.
  10. Starting from the large side, roll up dough, jelly-roll style. Pinch seam together to seal. Place seam side down, in prepared pan, joining the open ends and pinching them together.
  11. Cover with greased plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 45 minutes to 1 hour. Heat oven to 325º.
  12. Place pan on a baking sheet and bake about 1 hour or until top is golden brown and an instant read thermometer registers 190º
  13. Remove from oven and cool 20 minutes on a wire rack.
  14. Loosen sides of cake from pan with a butter knife, if necessary, and invert onto a wire rack until completely cool, dust with confectioners sugar, to taste. This coffee cake practically fell out of the Bundt cake pan. I swear by the home made cake release, its solid gold.
Recipe Notes

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#BundtBakers is a group of Bundt loving bakers who get together once a month to bake Bundts with a common ingredient or theme. You can see all our of lovely Bundts by following our Pinterest board. We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient.

Updated links for all of our past events and more information about BundtBakers, can be found on our <a href="http://www.foodlustpeoplelove.com/p/bundtbakers.html">home page</a>.

You can see all our of lovely Bundts by following our Pinterest board. Updated links for all of our past events and more information about #BundtBakers, can be found on our home page.

IS IT POPPY SEEDS OR POPPYSEEDS?

The poppy seed is mentioned in ancient medical texts from many civilizations. For instance, the Egyptian papyrus scroll named Ebers Papyrus, written c. 1550 BC, lists poppy seed as a sedative.  The Minoan civilization (approximately 2700 to 1450 BC), a Bronze Age civilization which arose on the island of Crete, cultivated poppies for their seed, and used a milk, opium and honey mixture to calm crying babies. The Sumerians are another civilization that are known to have grown poppy seeds.  Poppy seeds have long been used as a folk remedy to aid sleeping, promote fertility and wealth, and even to provide supposed magical powers of invisibility.

The seeds of some poppy types are not eaten, but they are cultivated for the flowers they produce. Annual and biennial poppies are considered a good choice to cultivate from seed as they are not difficult to propagate by this method, and can be put directly in the ground during January.  The California poppy, for example, is a striking orange wildflower that grows in the Western and Northwestern United States.  I remember vividly, the red poppy fields in "The Wizard of Oz".

According to The Joy of Cooking, "the most desirable poppyseeds come from Holland and are a slate-blue color."  The color of poppy seeds is important in some uses. When used as a thickener in some dishes, white poppy seeds are preferred, having less impact on the color of the food. In other dishes, black poppy seeds are preferred, for maximum impact.

Whole poppy seeds are widely used as a spice and decoration in and on top of many baked goods. In North America they are used in and on many food items such as poppy seed muffins, rusk, bagels (like the Montreal-style bagel), bialys, and cakes such as sponge cake. Across Europe, buns and soft white bread pastries are often sprinkled on top with black and white poppy seeds (for example Cozonac, Kalach Kolache and, Kołacz).

Fillings in pastries are sometimes made of finely ground poppy seeds mixed with butter or milk and sugar. The ground filling is used in poppy seed rolls and some croissants and may be flavored with lemon or orange zest, rum and vanilla with raisins, heavy cream, cinnamon, and chopped blanched almonds or walnuts added. For sweet baked goods, sometimes instead of sugar a tablespoon of jam, or other sweet binding agent, like syrup is substituted. The poppy seed for fillings are best when they are finely and freshly ground because this will make a big difference in the pastry filling's texture and taste. Some recipes for Mohnstriezel use poppy seed soaked in water for two hours or boiled in milk. A recipe for Ukrainian poppyseed cake recommends preparing the seeds by immersing in boiling water, straining and soaking in milk overnight.

Poppy seed paste is available commercially, in cans, the only way to go in my opinion.  Poppy seeds are very high in oil, so commercial pastes normally contain sugar, water, and an emulsifier such as soy lecithin to keep the paste from separating.  In the United States, commercial pastes are marketed under brand names including Solo {as in my recipe} and American Almond. Per 30 gram serving, the American Almond poppy seed paste has 120 calories, 4.5 grams fat, and 2 grams protein.  Using this poppyseed paste was so easy, I'll never make it from scratch.

Poppyseeds are used in various cuisines, all over the world.  Poppyseeds are used as an ingredient, flavoring, thickening agent and beverages.

In Eastern European Jewish cuisine, pastries filled with black poppy seeds in a sugary paste are traditional during Purim, which occurs exactly one month before Passover and approximately a month before Easter. Traditional pastries include poppy seed kalács and hamantashen, both sometimes known as beigli (also spelled bejgli). Poppy seed hamantashen were the main traditional food eaten by Ashkenazi Jews at Purim until the filling was replaced by other fruit and nut fillings. Poppy seed pastries are common in Jewish bakeries and delicatessens throughout the United States.

In Indian cuisine white poppy seeds are added for thickness, texture and also give added flavor to the recipe. Commonly used in the preparation of korma, ground poppy seeds, along with coconut and other spices, are combined as a paste, to be added at the last stage of cooking. It is quite hard to grind them when raw, so they are normally toasted/broiled and water added when grinding to get the right consistency.

The seeds themselves do not contain significant amounts of opiates. But a poppy tea consumed in some areas and often referred to as doda has been controversial for containing ground opium poppy plant, especially the seed head, and contains significant levels of opiates.  Popular in some South Asian communities, doda is created by grinding dried poppy husks or poppy seeds into a fine powder and then ingesting the mix with hot water or tea. In Canada, doda is made from poppy plants brought in from Afghanistan and Arizona under the guise of legal purposes such as floral arrangements, but is sold illegally from some meat markets.

Poppy seeds are highly nutritious, and less allergenic than many other seeds and nuts. Allergy to poppy seeds is very rare, but has been reported and can cause anaphylaxis.

Sufferers of diverticulosis are advised by many physicians to avoid poppy seeds because of the risk of the seed hulls irritating the diverticula, resulting in full-blown diverticulitis, however there is some dispute over the risk.  My aunt developed diverticulitis and had to undergo surgery to remove a part of her colon after eating a poppyseed muffin.  As an aside, It is believed that poppy seeds are a potential source of anti-cancer drugs.

As a point of interest, you can sometimes register a false  positive drug test.  Although the drug opium is produced by "milking" latex from the unripe fruits ("seed pods") rather than from the seeds, all parts of the plant can contain or carry the opium alkaloids, especially morphine and codeine. This means that eating foods (e.g., muffins) that contain poppy seeds can result in a false positive for opiates in a drug test.

Discovery Channel's MythBusters series episode "Poppy Seed Drug Test" demonstrated that eating both poppy seed bread and poppy seed bagels resulted in both of the hosts testing positive for opiate use, 30 minutes later.

A fictional example of such a false positive test in popular culture was in the Seinfeld episode "The Shower Head", where the character Elaine Benes was not allowed to visit Kalahari Bushmen with J. Peterman after testing positive for opium from the consumption of poppy seed muffins.  I remember this episode well.  It was hysterical.

The sale of poppy seeds from Papavernsomniferum is banned in Singapore because of the morphine content. Poppy seeds are also prohibited in Taiwan, primarily because of the risk that viable seeds will be sold and used to grow opium poppies.   China prohibits spice mixes made from poppyseed and poppyseed pods because of the traces of opiates in them, and has since at least 2005.   Despite its present use in Arab cuisine as a bread spice, poppy seeds are also banned in Saudi Arabia for various religious and drug control reasons.  In one extreme case in the United Arab Emirates, poppy seeds found on a traveler's clothes led to imprisonment.

As poppy seeds can cause false positive results in drug tests, it is advised in airports in India not to carry such items to other countries, where this can result in punishments based on false positive results. Travelers to the United Arab Emirates are especially prone to difficulties and severe punishments.

In Singapore, poppy seeds are classified as "prohibited goods" by the Central Narcotics Bureau (CNB).   💜

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#BUNDT BAKERS SOUR CREAM CRANBERRY POUND CAKE ~ CORRECTED

I think cranberries are “cheerful”. Whenever I see them used in recipes, I find myself wanting to bake something tasty. Cranberries are tangy and really enhance any recipes they’re used in. This month will be especially fun for me.

I love baking with cranberries, either dried cranberries or fresh.  I love everything about them, the color, the flavor and sometimes a little crunch.  Anything that contains cranberries just looks, feels and tastes like Christmas to me.  Combine my cranberry love plus my deep, deep love of cake – any kind is okay and this little cranberry dream can be on your serving plate within a couple hours.  

Much gratitude to Laura from Baking in Pajamas.  This yummy theme is brought to the rest of us #BundtBakers from her.   Coming up with a theme and preparing the lists looks to be ALOT of work.  Thanks Laura, I’ve been looking forward to your theme right after you declared it.  I hope everyone else is as excited as I am.

#BUNDT BAKERS SOUR CREAM CRANBERRY POUND CAKE
Print Recipe
This delightful Bundt is quite easily described. The cranberries are a bit tart {as they should be}, contrasted with the perfect sweet cake, highlighted with notes of orange. It's simple to put together, all ingredients are readily accessible, and the total cake is a tasty result of everything together. I love how gorgeous it looked when removed from the pan, the pale cake and the bright cranberries really compliment each other to, may I say, perfection. I will definitely make this bundt again. I plan to freeze a few bags of the fresh cranberries. Be sure to bake the muffins for only about half the time of the full cake. This recipe was more than enough for a 10 inch bundt with enough left for 3 large muss ins which also baked up beautifully.
Servings Prep Time
1 Bundt + 3 large muffins 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
90 Minutes 5 Minutes
Servings Prep Time
1 Bundt + 3 large muffins 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
90 Minutes 5 Minutes
#BUNDT BAKERS SOUR CREAM CRANBERRY POUND CAKE
Print Recipe
This delightful Bundt is quite easily described. The cranberries are a bit tart {as they should be}, contrasted with the perfect sweet cake, highlighted with notes of orange. It's simple to put together, all ingredients are readily accessible, and the total cake is a tasty result of everything together. I love how gorgeous it looked when removed from the pan, the pale cake and the bright cranberries really compliment each other to, may I say, perfection. I will definitely make this bundt again. I plan to freeze a few bags of the fresh cranberries. Be sure to bake the muffins for only about half the time of the full cake. This recipe was more than enough for a 10 inch bundt with enough left for 3 large muss ins which also baked up beautifully.
Servings Prep Time
1 Bundt + 3 large muffins 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
90 Minutes 5 Minutes
Servings Prep Time
1 Bundt + 3 large muffins 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
90 Minutes 5 Minutes
Ingredients
Servings: Bundt + 3 large muffins
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl, sift the flour and baking soda. Set aside
  2. Cream butter in your stand mixer, add sugar slowly, beating constantly.
  3. Add 6 eggs, one at a time and blending well after each addition.
  4. Stir in sour cream
  5. Add the flour mixture, about 1/2 cup at a time.
  6. Stir in orange extract, zest from one orange, and the fresh cranberries.
  7. Pour into prepared 10 inch bundt cake pan
  8. Bake at 325º for 90 minutes.
  9. Cool in pan 5 minutes.
  10. While still warm, glaze with 1 C confectioners sugar mixed with the juice of one orange.
Recipe Notes

Before we get into anything else, this recipe was modified from Served Up With Love.

As America's Original Superfruit ™, Native Americans used the cranberries as a staple as early as 1550. They ate cranberries fresh, ground, or mashed with cornmeal and baked it into bread. They also mixed berries with wild game and melted fat to form pemmican, a survival ration for the winter months. Maple sugar or honey was used to sweeten the berry's tangy flavor.

By 1620 Pilgrims learned how to use cranberries from the Native Americans. There are several theories of how the berry was named. German and Dutch settlers named the berry "crane-berry" because it appeared to be the favorite food of cranes or the blossom resembles the head and neck of an English crane. Eventually "crane-berry" was shortened to cranberry. By 1683 cranberry juice was made by the settlers.

The uses of cranberries is extensive — American whalers and mariners carried cranberries onboard to prevent scurvy while Indians brewed cranberry poultices to draw poison from arrow wounds and in tea to calm nerves as well as using the juice as a dye.

In Massachusetts, in 1816 Captain Henry Hall became the first to cultivate cranberries in Dennis, Massachusetts. He noticed that cranberries grew better when sand blew over them.

Wisconsin

In Wisconsin, around 1860 Edwards Sackett of Sackett Harbor, New York came to Berlin, Wisconsin to inspect some land. He found 700 acres of wild cranberry vines and decided to cultivate his bogs. He sold his cranberries in Chicago for about $15 a barrel. The cranberry is now Wisconsin's state fruit.  🐝💜

~Wikipedia

BundtBakers

#BundtBakers is a group of Bundt loving bakers who get together once a month to bake Bundts with a common ingredient or theme. Follow our Pinterest board right here. Links are also updated each month on the BundtBakers home page.

 

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#BUNDTBAKERS FRESH PEAR BUNDT CAKE WITH CREAMY VANILLA GLAZE

National Bundt Day comes around each year on November 15th. It was originally proclaimed by the Governor of Minnesota in honor of Nordic Ware’s 60th anniversary, making 2016 the eleventh annual Minnesota Bundt Day, while coinciding with National Bundt Day! It is the perfect time of year since most families are pulling out recipes, preheating the oven and baking more than ever!

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🐝 I’ve never been a big fan of cooked pears so this topic presented me with a real challenge.   I thought that out of all the recipes I reviewed, I might actually enjoy not only making this cake but eating it too. I must thank Lauren Everson from Sew You Think You Can Cook for this interesting theme. I think this will be a refreshing change from my usual baked treats. Thanks Lauren and though it’s a bit early, Happy Thanksgiving 🦃 to you and all the other #BundtBakers 🍁.   Also, thanks for your help, I didn’t realize I was in the wrong spot.  This recipe has been adapted from Taste of the South magazine.  Thanks for this creative and unique recipe.  I plan to enjoy the taste of Fall.

As an aside, I actually made my own cake release.  It’s simply equal parts of shortening; flour, and oil.  I used coconut oil for the health properties it contains.  BTW, it works.

#BUNDTBAKERS FRESH PEAR BUNDT CAKE WITH CREAMY VANILLA GLAZE
Print Recipe
I chose to actually make this cake on National Bundt Cake Day to ensure an especially tasty cake. So far, so good. The aroma was a welcome fragrance, reminiscent of Fall. This theme was a proven success. This was a very simple recipe but with a complex flavor. It's really very tasty {and I dislike cooked pears}. I'm pretty sure all who make it will enjoy it.
Servings Prep Time
10 ~ 12 People 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
75 Minutes 2 Hours
Servings Prep Time
10 ~ 12 People 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
75 Minutes 2 Hours
#BUNDTBAKERS FRESH PEAR BUNDT CAKE WITH CREAMY VANILLA GLAZE
Print Recipe
I chose to actually make this cake on National Bundt Cake Day to ensure an especially tasty cake. So far, so good. The aroma was a welcome fragrance, reminiscent of Fall. This theme was a proven success. This was a very simple recipe but with a complex flavor. It's really very tasty {and I dislike cooked pears}. I'm pretty sure all who make it will enjoy it.
Servings Prep Time
10 ~ 12 People 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
75 Minutes 2 Hours
Servings Prep Time
10 ~ 12 People 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
75 Minutes 2 Hours
Ingredients
FOR THE CAKE
CREAMY VANILLA GLAZE
Servings: People
Instructions
THE CAKE
  1. Preheat oven to 325º F; prepare a 15 cup Bundt pan with cake release, home made or purchased
  2. In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, cinnamon, baking soda, salt, ginger and cardamom. Whisk until well mixed.
  3. Make a well in the dry ingredenients; add eggs, continue whisking to combine.
  4. Gradually add canola oil. Fold in pear 🍐, vanilla and orange zest. Continue stirrng until well combined. Pour batter into prepared bundt cake pan and smooth with the back of a metal spoon.
  5. Bake for 1 hour and 15 minutes or until your cake tester comes out clean.
  6. Allow the cake to cool in the pan on a wire rack for 20 minutes. Invert cake onto a rack and cool completely. Drizzle with Creamy Vanilla Glaze, if desired.
CREAMY VANILLA GLAZE
  1. In a small saucepan, bring brown sugar, cream, butter, vanilla and salt. Bring to a boil over medium~high heat.
  2. Cook, whisking constantly for one minute. Remove from heat and let cool completely. Gradually whisk in confectioners sugar. Pour Glaze over cooled cake.
Recipe Notes

NATIONAL BUNDT DAY ~ NOVEMBER 15

Bundt Cake

A Bundt cake /bʌnt/ is a cake that is baked in a Bundt pan, shaping it into a distinctive ring shape. The shape is inspired by a traditional European cake known as Gugelhupf, but Bundt cakes are not generally associated with any single recipe. The style of mold in North America was popularized in the 1950s and 1960s, after cookware manufacturer Nordic Ware trademarked the name "Bundt" and began producing Bundt pans from cast aluminum. Publicity from Pillsbury saw the cakes gain widespread popularity.

Etymology:

The Bundt cake derives in part from a European brioche-like cake called Gugelhupf which was particularly popular among Jewish communities in parts of Germany, Austria and Poland. In the north of Germany Gugelhupf is traditionally known as Bundkuchen (German pronunciation: [ˈbʊntkuːxn̩]), a name formed by joining the two words Bund and Kuchen (cake).

Opinions differ as to the significance of the word Bund. One possibility is that it means "bunch" or "bundle", and refers to the way the dough is bundled around the tubed center of the pan. Another source suggests that it describes the banded appearance given to the cake by the fluted sides of the pan, similar to a tied sheaf or bundle of wheat. Some authors have

Uses of the word bund outside of Europe to describe cakes can be found in Jewish-American cookbooks from around the start of the 20th century. The alternative spelling "bundte" also appears in a recipe as early as 1901.

Design

Bundt-style pans can be made of silicone and metal. Bundt cakes do not conform to any single recipe; instead their characterizing feature is their shape. A Bundt pan generally has fluted or grooved sides, but its most defining design element is the central tube or "chimney" which leaves a cylindrical hole through the center of the cake. The design means that more of the mixture touches the surface of the pan than in a simple round pan, helping to provide faster and more even heat distribution during cooking. The shape is similar to that of the earlier European Gugelhupf or Bundkuchen. A Gugelhupf differs from contemporary Bundt-style cakes in that it follows a particular yeast-based recipe, with fruit and nuts, and is often deeper in shape and more decorative. Also similar in shape is the Eastern European Babka, dating from early 18th century Poland. While Babka is associated with Jewish culture, Bundt cake is firmly set in Christian tradition and is traditionally baked for Christmas and Easter. Today, there is no recipe for "Bundt cake". Anything can be baked in a Bundt-style pan, and is. Recipes range from Pine Nut and Chili cakes to ice cream and fruit concoctions. And, Bundt-style pan design has expanded beyond the original fluted ring to today's designs of skylines, octopus and cathedrals, all with the requisite hole in the center of the pan made by Nordic Ware and others. Since a toroidal cake is rather difficult to frost, Bundt cakes are typically either dusted with powdered sugar, drizzle-glazed, or served undecorated. Recipes specifically designed for Bundt pans often have a baked-in filling; Bundt pound cakes are also common.

Since the name "Bundt" is a trademark, similar pans are often sold as "fluted tube pans" or given other similar descriptive titles. The trademark holder Nordic Ware only produces Bundt pans in aluminum, but similar fluted pans are available in other materials.

Rise to Popularity:

The people credited with popularizing the Bundt cake are American businessman H. David Dalquist and his brother Mark S. Dalquist, who co-founded cookware company Nordic Ware based in St. Louis Park, Minnesota. In the late 1940s, Rose Joshua and Fannie Schanfield, friends and members of the Minneapolis Jewish-American Hadassah Society approached Dalquist asking if he could produce a modern version of a traditional cast iron Gugelhupf dish. Dalquist and company engineer Don Nygren designed a cast aluminum version which Nordic Ware then made a small production run of in 1950. In order to successfully trademark the pans, a "t" was added to the word "Bund". A number of the original Bundt pans now reside in the Smithsonian collection.

Initially, the Bundt pan sold so poorly that Nordic Ware considered discontinuing it. The product received a boost when it was mentioned in the New Good Housekeeping Cookbook in 1963, but did not gain real popularity until 1966, when a Bundt cake called the "Tunnel of Fudge", baked by Ella Helfrich, took second place at the annual Pillsbury Bake-Off and won its baker $5,000. The resulting publicity resulted in more than 200,000 requests to Pillsbury for Bundt pans and soon led to the Bundt pan surpassing the tin Jell-O mold as the most-sold pan in the United States. In the 1970s Pillsbury licensed the name Bundt from Nordic Ware and for a while sold a range of Bundt cake mixes.

To date, more than 60 million Bundt pans have been sold by Nordic Ware across North America. 💜 ~Wikipedia

And don’t forget to take a peek at what other talented bakers have baked this month:

BundtBakers is a group of Bundt loving bakers who get together once a month to bake Bundts with a common ingredient or theme. You can see all our of lovely Bundts by following our Pinterest board. We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient.

Updated links for all of our past events and more information about BundtBakers, can be found on our <a href="http://www.foodlustpeoplelove.com/p/bundtbakers.html">home page</a>.

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ROBERT E. LEE BUNDT CAKE

This Bundt cake, while continuing the lemon/orange main target flavor, it has been lightened up over the years but I thought the first recipes would be of interest. This lovely cake is not at all difficult and the bundt version bakes up beautifully. I can attest to the flavor, it’s perfect. I have to save a piece for my Home Health Nurse. It was baking when she arrived today and commented on it so I promised to save her a piece.

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This Bundt cake has definitely been lightened up and made with today’s busy women in mind.  It is no longer tedious and time consuming.  This bundt cake is simple, you probably have all or most of the ingredients in your pantry.  It can be put together in under 30 minutes and the results  far exceed the effort of making it.  No wonder the General loved it.

The recent fracas over the Confederate battle flags at Robert E. Lee’s crypt masks a great irony: Lee would have been among the first to say the flags should go.

Where Confederate battle flag replicas once flew at Washington and Lee University in the chapel above Robert E. Lee’s tomb, controversy now hangs as Virginians prepare to observe the January 19 birthday of the Confederate general-turned-college president.

Almost 150 years after the end of the Civil War, the skirmishing over how to remember the most famous rebel general continues even at a Virginia college named, in part, for him. About half the students and alumni polled by a campus magazine opposed the decision to remove the flags this summer. Fortunately, the university officials who made the call can draw on the example of an improbable and imperfect champion: Lee himself.

JONATHAN HORN
01.15.15 3:45 AM ET

Check out the “original” recipe.  Quite an endeavor.  While  he led the Confederate Army with great fervor, once he surrended, he was the administer for many years in a prestigious educational facility.  See below for further information.

 

ROBERT E. LEE BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
This cake has several recipes all over the web. The bundt cake looks to be the easiest of the recipes I found. The variations differ widely. The original cake was a 2 layer cake, and the instructions far more laborious. This is by no means a low calorie dessert but is well worth the effort and calories.
Servings Prep Time
12 Servings 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
1 hour 5 ~ 15 Minutes 2+ Hours
Servings Prep Time
12 Servings 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
1 hour 5 ~ 15 Minutes 2+ Hours
ROBERT E. LEE BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
This cake has several recipes all over the web. The bundt cake looks to be the easiest of the recipes I found. The variations differ widely. The original cake was a 2 layer cake, and the instructions far more laborious. This is by no means a low calorie dessert but is well worth the effort and calories.
Servings Prep Time
12 Servings 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
1 hour 5 ~ 15 Minutes 2+ Hours
Servings Prep Time
12 Servings 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
1 hour 5 ~ 15 Minutes 2+ Hours
Ingredients
Servings: Servings
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 325º F. In your heavy duty stand mixer {Kitchen Aid} beat butter and shortening at medium speed until creamy. Gradually, add granulated sugar, continue beating at medium speed until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, beating just until blended after each addition.