#ISW SCONE WEEK 2017 CLASSIC SNICKERS SCONES

Once again I found time to work with my favorite media, scones! For me, baking can be a very creative outlet . Above all other recipes, scones are my most adored. They come together easily and the final result is always delicious; scone recipes are quite varied from savory to cream scones to sweet scones. I especially love how scone recipes can be slightly altered, yet produce something all together unique.

This recipe is for a very dear friend’s {EXTREMELY BELATED} Birthday gift.  It is a special request scone and I know she and her Mom will really enjoy them.  I’m no longer able to jump in the car and go to Michael’s to pick up a nice presentation box and lace doily to help your scones look  more festive.   These scones barely made it out of the oven before Mr. B was asking for a sample.  While I made them specifically for my friend, I’m sure she won’t miss one or two.  I had to fight him off long enough so I could make the milk chocolate ganache.   The milk chocolate added another flavor layer to these already delicious scones.

#ISW 2017 CLASSIC SNICKERS SCONES
Print Recipe
These are light, tender and fabulous. They looked quite lovely in the presentation box. They came together quickly and although grating frozen butter was a bit of a nuisance, it made a world of difference. I think I'll continue using this technique for all my future scones. I'm going to try to use my food processor to grate the butter. A bit more to clean up after but it would certainly streamline preparing the scones for the oven. The glaze is so tasty I was tempted to eat it right out of the bowl. I highly recommend giving these a try, they are well worth the small effort they require.
Servings Prep Time
20 Mini Scones 20 Minutes {approximately}
Cook Time Passive Time
20 Minutes 40 really long Minutes
Servings Prep Time
20 Mini Scones 20 Minutes {approximately}
Cook Time Passive Time
20 Minutes 40 really long Minutes
#ISW 2017 CLASSIC SNICKERS SCONES
Print Recipe
These are light, tender and fabulous. They looked quite lovely in the presentation box. They came together quickly and although grating frozen butter was a bit of a nuisance, it made a world of difference. I think I'll continue using this technique for all my future scones. I'm going to try to use my food processor to grate the butter. A bit more to clean up after but it would certainly streamline preparing the scones for the oven. The glaze is so tasty I was tempted to eat it right out of the bowl. I highly recommend giving these a try, they are well worth the small effort they require.
Servings Prep Time
20 Mini Scones 20 Minutes {approximately}
Cook Time Passive Time
20 Minutes 40 really long Minutes
Servings Prep Time
20 Mini Scones 20 Minutes {approximately}
Cook Time Passive Time
20 Minutes 40 really long Minutes
Ingredients
Classic Snickers Scones
Milk Chocolate Glaze
  • 4 Ounces Milk chocolate Chopped
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Shortening I used solid coconut oil.
  • snickers Finely chopped for decoration and just an excuse to add more candy bar
Servings: Mini Scones
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 450º F and line a cookie sheet with parchment or use a silpat mat
  2. Stir together the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt.
  3. Grate the frozen butter on the large holes of a box grater. I tried this method last year, and it worked like a dream. Mix the flour and frozen butter with your fingers until well combined and crumbly.
  4. Whisk together the egg, buttermilk and Vanilla Bean Paste. Pour into the flour/butter mixture and stir until, until combined. The dough should look very shaggy.. Fold in the frozen, chopped Snickers.
  5. Place tablespoons of the shaggy dough into a prepared scone pan. Mine is a mini scone pan I'm particularly fond of.
  6. If any Snickers are poking out of the dough, poke them back in to avoid the caramel oozing and burning while baking.
  7. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, until golden. After 10 minutes, switch the scone pan around so the front becomes the back. Remove from baking sheet or pan and allow to cool on a wire cooling rack.
  8. While the scones are cooling, make the glaze. Melt the chopped milk chocolate and coconut oil (solid) in the microwave on 50% power for 30 second intervals. Stir after each interval, until melted. Drizzle lavishly delicious glaze over baked scones. Sprinkle finely chopped, frozen, Snickers over the milk chocolate glaze. [sheer perfection}. Even though they are a gift, I'm going to snatch a couple for my evening tea. Can't wait.
Recipe Notes

I have  always been a fan of Snickers candy bars but when they started producing  them with different nuts, I just about lost it.  My personal choice is still Almond Snickers but I'm crazy about this candy bar in any flavor.  There is no better way to enjoy them when baked into a light, flakey scone..  They are after all "a bit of Heaven in your hand" (to quote a very bright gal, me).  This recipe gave me 20 mini scones plus an additional four on a baking sheet.  They are so rich and delectable that a mini scone is just right to satisfy, but, two are just that much tastier.🐝💜

A scone is a single-serving quick bread/cake, usually made of wheat, barley or oatmeal with baking powder as a leavening agent and baked on sheet pans. A scone is often lightly sweetened and occasionally glazed with egg wash.  The scone is a basic component of the cream tea or Devonshire tea. It differs from teacakes and other sweet buns that are made with yeast.

The pronunciation of the word within the English-speaking world varies. According to one academic study, two-thirds of the British population pronounce it /ˈskɒn/ (rhymes with gone) with the preference rising to 99% in the Scottish population.  This is also the pronunciation in Ulster, as well as among Australians and Canadians. Others, including natives of the Republic of Ireland and the United States, pronounce the word as /ˈskoʊn/ (rhymes with tone).  British dictionaries usually show the /ˈskɒn/ form as the preferred pronunciation, while recognising the /ˈskoʊn/ form.

The Oxford Dictionaries explain that there are also regional and class differences in England connected with the different pronunciations:

There are two possible pronunciations of the word scone: the first rhymes with gone and the second rhymes with tone. In US English, the pronunciation rhyming with tone is more common. In British English, the two pronunciations traditionally have different regional and class associations, with the first pronunciation associated with the north of England, while the second is associated with the south.

The difference in pronunciation is alluded to in a poem:

I asked the maid in dulcet tone
To order me a buttered scone;
The silly girl has been and gone
And ordered me a buttered scone.

The Oxford English Dictionary reports that the first mention of the word was in 1513. Origin of the word scone is obscure and may, in fact, derive from different sources. That is, the classic Scottish scone which, according to Sheila MacNiven Cameron in The Highlander's Cookbook, originated as a bannock cut into pieces; and the Dutch schoonbrood or "spoonbread" (very similar to the drop scone); and possibly other, similar and similarly named quick breads, may have made their way onto the British tea table, where their similar names merged into one.

Thus, scone may derive from the Middle Dutch schoonbrood (fine white bread), from schoon (pure, clean) and brood (bread),  and/or it may also derive from the Scots Gaelic term sgonn meaning a shapeless mass or large mouthful. The Middle Low German term schöne meaning fine bread may also have played a role in the origination of this word. And if the explanation put forward by Sheila MacNiven Cameron be true, the word may also be based on the town of Scone (/ˈskuːn/) (Scots: Scuin, Scottish Gaelic: Sgàin) in Scotland, the ancient capital of that country – where Scottish monarchs were still crowned, even after the capital was moved to Perth, then to Edinburgh (and on whose Scone Stone the monarchs of the United Kingdom are still crowned today).  I found information on line and looked into, applied and was accepted as a Scone.  So, I am a Scone.

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GERMAN’S CHOCOLATE SCONES #ISW2016

I’ve been impatiently waiting for International Scone Week all year. I knew the scones I wanted to present but it took a lot of research to find a starting point. Now that it’s here, I hope my recipe won’t disappoint.

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This recipe was alot of fun and both interesting to research and to make.  I’ve been a fan of German Chocolate since early childhood.  As my baking skills progressed, I found a plethora of German Chocolate recipes.  However, as the “Queen of Scones” I was obligated to develop a scone of German Chocolate.  Rather than the usual caramel, coconut and pecan frosting, I chose a drizzling of chocolate and topped with toasted coconut flakes.  I do hope you enjoy my little creation and make it yourself one day.

GERMAN'S CHOCOLATE SCONES
Print Recipe
A delicate, scrumptious scone which as you know "is a little bit of Heaven in your hand". German chocolate anything is my favorite comfort food and always my choice when available. Oddly, there wasn't much that I could find, that offered the flavor i was looking for.
Servings Prep Time
8 Scones 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20 ~ 30 Minutes 1 Hour
Servings Prep Time
8 Scones 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20 ~ 30 Minutes 1 Hour
GERMAN'S CHOCOLATE SCONES
Print Recipe
A delicate, scrumptious scone which as you know "is a little bit of Heaven in your hand". German chocolate anything is my favorite comfort food and always my choice when available. Oddly, there wasn't much that I could find, that offered the flavor i was looking for.
Servings Prep Time
8 Scones 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20 ~ 30 Minutes 1 Hour
Servings Prep Time
8 Scones 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20 ~ 30 Minutes 1 Hour
Ingredients
Servings: Scones
Instructions
The Scones
  1. Heat oven to 375º F
  2. Blend flour, baking powder, unsweetened cocoa and salt in a large bowl and mix thoroughly. Add solid coconut oil and butter and cut in using a fork, pastry blender, or better yet, get your fastidiously clean hands into the work bowl and blend ingredients until crumbly in texture.
  3. Add heavy cream and sugar. Stir thoroughly and add either flour or additional heavy cream to make the dough come together well.
  4. Stir in coconut and chopped chocolate.
  5. Mix 3 Tablespoons confectioners sugar with 1 teaspoon cocoa powder, and sprinkle on the parchment~lined baking sheet. This will keep the scones from sticking to the pan as you shape them. Shape into an 8 inch square, about 3/4 inches thick. Cut into 8 triangles.
  6. Using a pastry brush, brush the tops of each scone with additional heavy cream; then dust with a very light sanding sugar to add nice bit of crunch.
  7. Bake for about 15 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from baking pan and allow to cool on a cooling rack.
The Glaze
  1. Place the chocolate bits and heavy cream in a microwave~safe bowl or small saucepan. Heat in the microwave or saucepan over a low heat until the cream is very hot. Remove from heat and stir until all the chocolate bits melt and the mixture is smooth
  2. Spread over cooled scones. Sprinkle toasted coconut flakes on top of glaze. Serve and enjoy.
Recipe Notes

This recipe was adapted from Melanie Kathryn~Gather for Bread

Contrary to popular belief, German chocolate cake did not originate in Germany. Its roots can be traced back to 1852 when American Samuel German developed a type of dark baking chocolate for the American Baker's Chocolate Company. The brand name of the product, Baker's German's Sweet Chocolate, was named in honor of him.

On June 3, 1957, a recipe for "German's Chocolate Cake" appeared as the "Recipe of the Day" in the Dallas Morning Star.  It was created by Mrs. George Clay, a homemaker from 3831 Academy Drive, Dallas, Texas.  This recipe used the baking chocolate introduced 105 years prior and became quite popular. General Foods, which owned the Baker's brand at the time, took notice and distributed the cake recipe to other newspapers in the country. Sales of Baker's Chocolate are said to have increased by as much as 73% and the cake would become a national staple. The possessive form (German's) was dropped in subsequent publications, forming the "German Chocolate Cake" identity and giving the false impression of a German origin.

The recipe still remains popular to this day and has been adopted by baking companies.

June 11 is National German Chocolate Cake Day in America.

~~~Wikipedia~~~

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#BUNDTBAKERS ALMOND LAVENDER BUNDT CAKE

While this cake was baking, the house was filled with the most enticing aroma. When working with culinary lavender, it’s best to remember that a little goes a long way. If you use too much it just tastes like perfume.

This month’s theme is Secret Garden, and  I want to give an appreciative shout out to Sue Lau of ~A Palatable Pastime~ for this ingenious and fun theme.  Well done Sue, many thanks.  I really enjoyed this particular theme and had a lot of fun with it.

In my previous home in Southern California, I had an absolutely lovely garden.  I had a huge lavender field in one corner, an English garden filled with all my favorite herbs, and a long side garden filled with flavored and aromatic geraniums; several varieties of mint along my back fence and just one rose bush.  I am not able to have a garden like that here in Arizona and I miss it all, every day.

My point was I loved my garden and harvested mint and herbs on a daily basis.  But my lavender, oh my lavender was not only my cat’s favorite spot, but it was, in my opinion, quite gorgeous.  I had lavender “everything”, sugar, salt, jelly and anything else that was edible lavender. So now, “My Secret Garden” is only in my heart and just a memory.

#BUNDTBAKERS ALMOND LAVENDER BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
A very tender, aromatic and unusually flavored cake. I baked it in my rose Bundt pan so there was a bit of very tasty crunch which was a nice surprise. This cake was not difficult, nor did it require a great deal of time to put together. It was well~received with various exclamations of satisfaction and compliments. I will make this again for special occasions or at the request of family. The flavor was a little sophisticated but perfect for special occasions, holidays or everyday as well.
Servings Prep Time
1 Bundt Cake 25 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30 + 30 Minutes approximately 20 Minutes
Servings Prep Time
1 Bundt Cake 25 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30 + 30 Minutes approximately 20 Minutes
#BUNDTBAKERS ALMOND LAVENDER BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
A very tender, aromatic and unusually flavored cake. I baked it in my rose Bundt pan so there was a bit of very tasty crunch which was a nice surprise. This cake was not difficult, nor did it require a great deal of time to put together. It was well~received with various exclamations of satisfaction and compliments. I will make this again for special occasions or at the request of family. The flavor was a little sophisticated but perfect for special occasions, holidays or everyday as well.
Servings Prep Time
1 Bundt Cake 25 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30 + 30 Minutes approximately 20 Minutes
Servings Prep Time
1 Bundt Cake 25 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30 + 30 Minutes approximately 20 Minutes
Ingredients
Servings: Bundt Cake
Instructions
The Bundt Cake
  1. Use your favorite cake pan release in a 10 inch bundt cake pan and sprinkle with sugar. Set aside.
  2. Place 1/2 cup sugar, almonds, and 1 teaspoon lavender in a food processor, cover and process until finely ground.
  3. In a large bowl, cream butter and remaining sugar until light and fluffy; beat in processed almond and lavender mixture until combined. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in vanilla.
  4. In a small bowl, combine sour cream and half~and~half. Combine the flour, baking soda and salt, sift and add to the creamed mixture alternately with sour cream mixture, beating well after each addition.
  5. Pour into prepared pan. Bake at 300º F for 30 minutes then raise temperature to 325 F for an additional 30~35 minutes until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool for 10 minutes before removing from pan to a wire rack to cool completely.
Glaze Drizzle
  1. For drizzle, in a small bowl, make a tisane combining lavender buds and hot water. Cover and let steep for 5 minutes. Strain, discarding lavender buds. {alternate glaze recipe follows directly below}.
  2. In another small bowl, Combine confectioners sugar, the almond extract and enough half~and~half to reach desired consistency. Garnish with additional lavender buds if desired.
Recipe Notes

The Bundt pan was invented in the 1950s by a man named H. David Dalquist. The pan was based on a traditional ceramic dish with a similar ringed shape. Though Dalquist's version was lighter and easier to use than the clunky previous version, sales were disappointing.

Then, in 1966, a woman named Ella Helfrich took second place in the annual Pillsbury Bake-Off with her recipe for Tunnel of Fudge Cake. The walnut-filled, chocolate-glazed cake had a ring of gooey fudge at its center. Eating a slice was reminiscent of indulging in under-baked brownie batter. Helfrich's cake was an overnight sensation. Pillsbury received more than 200,000 requests for the pan she used, and Dalquist's company went into overtime production. Today, more than 50 million Bundt pans have been sold around the world. They come in a multitude of sizes, shapes and specialty cakes.

Instead  of a lavender tisane for the glaze, I added almond extract which gave the cake a mild but tasty addition.  I think the next time I might reduce the amount of lavender because although I loved it this way,  I felt one more lavender bud might just be too much.  At 3 teaspoons of lavender, I felt it put the cake just at the borderline.  I would make it exactly the same as well depending on my guests tastes.  This would be a fine addition to any tea. 💜

LINK LIST

BundtBakers

#BundtBakers is a group of Bundt loving bakers who get together once a month to bake Bundts with a common ingredient or theme.  Follow our Pinterest board right here. Links are also updated each month on the BundtBakers home page.

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