#BUNDTBAKERS FRESH PEAR BUNDT CAKE WITH CREAMY VANILLA GLAZE

National Bundt Day comes around each year on November 15th. It was originally proclaimed by the Governor of Minnesota in honor of Nordic Ware’s 60th anniversary, making 2016 the eleventh annual Minnesota Bundt Day, while coinciding with National Bundt Day! It is the perfect time of year since most families are pulling out recipes, preheating the oven and baking more than ever!

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🐝 I’ve never been a big fan of cooked pears so this topic presented me with a real challenge.   I thought that out of all the recipes I reviewed, I might actually enjoy not only making this cake but eating it too. I must thank Lauren Everson from Sew You Think You Can Cook for this interesting theme. I think this will be a refreshing change from my usual baked treats. Thanks Lauren and though it’s a bit early, Happy Thanksgiving 🦃 to you and all the other #BundtBakers 🍁.   Also, thanks for your help, I didn’t realize I was in the wrong spot.  This recipe has been adapted from Taste of the South magazine.  Thanks for this creative and unique recipe.  I plan to enjoy the taste of Fall.

As an aside, I actually made my own cake release.  It’s simply equal parts of shortening; flour, and oil.  I used coconut oil for the health properties it contains.  BTW, it works.

#BUNDTBAKERS FRESH PEAR BUNDT CAKE WITH CREAMY VANILLA GLAZE
Print Recipe
I chose to actually make this cake on National Bundt Cake Day to ensure an especially tasty cake. So far, so good. The aroma was a welcome fragrance, reminiscent of Fall. This theme was a proven success. This was a very simple recipe but with a complex flavor. It's really very tasty {and I dislike cooked pears}. I'm pretty sure all who make it will enjoy it.
Servings Prep Time
10 ~ 12 People 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
75 Minutes 2 Hours
Servings Prep Time
10 ~ 12 People 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
75 Minutes 2 Hours
#BUNDTBAKERS FRESH PEAR BUNDT CAKE WITH CREAMY VANILLA GLAZE
Print Recipe
I chose to actually make this cake on National Bundt Cake Day to ensure an especially tasty cake. So far, so good. The aroma was a welcome fragrance, reminiscent of Fall. This theme was a proven success. This was a very simple recipe but with a complex flavor. It's really very tasty {and I dislike cooked pears}. I'm pretty sure all who make it will enjoy it.
Servings Prep Time
10 ~ 12 People 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
75 Minutes 2 Hours
Servings Prep Time
10 ~ 12 People 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
75 Minutes 2 Hours
Ingredients
FOR THE CAKE
CREAMY VANILLA GLAZE
Servings: People
Instructions
THE CAKE
  1. Preheat oven to 325º F; prepare a 15 cup Bundt pan with cake release, home made or purchased
  2. In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, cinnamon, baking soda, salt, ginger and cardamom. Whisk until well mixed.
  3. Make a well in the dry ingredenients; add eggs, continue whisking to combine.
  4. Gradually add canola oil. Fold in pear 🍐, vanilla and orange zest. Continue stirrng until well combined. Pour batter into prepared bundt cake pan and smooth with the back of a metal spoon.
  5. Bake for 1 hour and 15 minutes or until your cake tester comes out clean.
  6. Allow the cake to cool in the pan on a wire rack for 20 minutes. Invert cake onto a rack and cool completely. Drizzle with Creamy Vanilla Glaze, if desired.
CREAMY VANILLA GLAZE
  1. In a small saucepan, bring brown sugar, cream, butter, vanilla and salt. Bring to a boil over medium~high heat.
  2. Cook, whisking constantly for one minute. Remove from heat and let cool completely. Gradually whisk in confectioners sugar. Pour Glaze over cooled cake.
Recipe Notes

NATIONAL BUNDT DAY ~ NOVEMBER 15

Bundt Cake

A Bundt cake /bʌnt/ is a cake that is baked in a Bundt pan, shaping it into a distinctive ring shape. The shape is inspired by a traditional European cake known as Gugelhupf, but Bundt cakes are not generally associated with any single recipe. The style of mold in North America was popularized in the 1950s and 1960s, after cookware manufacturer Nordic Ware trademarked the name "Bundt" and began producing Bundt pans from cast aluminum. Publicity from Pillsbury saw the cakes gain widespread popularity.

Etymology:

The Bundt cake derives in part from a European brioche-like cake called Gugelhupf which was particularly popular among Jewish communities in parts of Germany, Austria and Poland. In the north of Germany Gugelhupf is traditionally known as Bundkuchen (German pronunciation: [ˈbʊntkuːxn̩]), a name formed by joining the two words Bund and Kuchen (cake).

Opinions differ as to the significance of the word Bund. One possibility is that it means "bunch" or "bundle", and refers to the way the dough is bundled around the tubed center of the pan. Another source suggests that it describes the banded appearance given to the cake by the fluted sides of the pan, similar to a tied sheaf or bundle of wheat. Some authors have

Uses of the word bund outside of Europe to describe cakes can be found in Jewish-American cookbooks from around the start of the 20th century. The alternative spelling "bundte" also appears in a recipe as early as 1901.

Design

Bundt-style pans can be made of silicone and metal. Bundt cakes do not conform to any single recipe; instead their characterizing feature is their shape. A Bundt pan generally has fluted or grooved sides, but its most defining design element is the central tube or "chimney" which leaves a cylindrical hole through the center of the cake. The design means that more of the mixture touches the surface of the pan than in a simple round pan, helping to provide faster and more even heat distribution during cooking. The shape is similar to that of the earlier European Gugelhupf or Bundkuchen. A Gugelhupf differs from contemporary Bundt-style cakes in that it follows a particular yeast-based recipe, with fruit and nuts, and is often deeper in shape and more decorative. Also similar in shape is the Eastern European Babka, dating from early 18th century Poland. While Babka is associated with Jewish culture, Bundt cake is firmly set in Christian tradition and is traditionally baked for Christmas and Easter. Today, there is no recipe for "Bundt cake". Anything can be baked in a Bundt-style pan, and is. Recipes range from Pine Nut and Chili cakes to ice cream and fruit concoctions. And, Bundt-style pan design has expanded beyond the original fluted ring to today's designs of skylines, octopus and cathedrals, all with the requisite hole in the center of the pan made by Nordic Ware and others. Since a toroidal cake is rather difficult to frost, Bundt cakes are typically either dusted with powdered sugar, drizzle-glazed, or served undecorated. Recipes specifically designed for Bundt pans often have a baked-in filling; Bundt pound cakes are also common.

Since the name "Bundt" is a trademark, similar pans are often sold as "fluted tube pans" or given other similar descriptive titles. The trademark holder Nordic Ware only produces Bundt pans in aluminum, but similar fluted pans are available in other materials.

Rise to Popularity:

The people credited with popularizing the Bundt cake are American businessman H. David Dalquist and his brother Mark S. Dalquist, who co-founded cookware company Nordic Ware based in St. Louis Park, Minnesota. In the late 1940s, Rose Joshua and Fannie Schanfield, friends and members of the Minneapolis Jewish-American Hadassah Society approached Dalquist asking if he could produce a modern version of a traditional cast iron Gugelhupf dish. Dalquist and company engineer Don Nygren designed a cast aluminum version which Nordic Ware then made a small production run of in 1950. In order to successfully trademark the pans, a "t" was added to the word "Bund". A number of the original Bundt pans now reside in the Smithsonian collection.

Initially, the Bundt pan sold so poorly that Nordic Ware considered discontinuing it. The product received a boost when it was mentioned in the New Good Housekeeping Cookbook in 1963, but did not gain real popularity until 1966, when a Bundt cake called the "Tunnel of Fudge", baked by Ella Helfrich, took second place at the annual Pillsbury Bake-Off and won its baker $5,000. The resulting publicity resulted in more than 200,000 requests to Pillsbury for Bundt pans and soon led to the Bundt pan surpassing the tin Jell-O mold as the most-sold pan in the United States. In the 1970s Pillsbury licensed the name Bundt from Nordic Ware and for a while sold a range of Bundt cake mixes.

To date, more than 60 million Bundt pans have been sold by Nordic Ware across North America. 💜 ~Wikipedia

And don’t forget to take a peek at what other talented bakers have baked this month:

BundtBakers is a group of Bundt loving bakers who get together once a month to bake Bundts with a common ingredient or theme. You can see all our of lovely Bundts by following our Pinterest board. We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient.

Updated links for all of our past events and more information about BundtBakers, can be found on our <a href="http://www.foodlustpeoplelove.com/p/bundtbakers.html">home page</a>.

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#BundtBakers ~ The Blue Djinn of Babylon Persian Cardamom Bundt Cake

When I heard that our new theme was “One Thousand and One Nights”, I immediately conjured up visions of beautiful flying carpets, magic lamps and wise~cracking Djinn and genies . This is a one~off Persian, Cardamom and Orange cake adapted from Amy Glaze at Amy Glaze’s Pommes d’Amour. Thank you Amy for this fabulous cake which was adjusted only a little.

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#BundtBakers ~ The Blue Djinn of Babylon Persian Cardamom Bundt Cake
Print Recipe
A beautiful, aromatic Bundt that will tantalize your senses with new and exciting flavor and aromas.
Servings Prep Time
10 ~ 12 People 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 - 60 Minutes 60 Minutes
Servings Prep Time
10 ~ 12 People 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 - 60 Minutes 60 Minutes
#BundtBakers ~ The Blue Djinn of Babylon Persian Cardamom Bundt Cake
Print Recipe
A beautiful, aromatic Bundt that will tantalize your senses with new and exciting flavor and aromas.
Servings Prep Time
10 ~ 12 People 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 - 60 Minutes 60 Minutes
Servings Prep Time
10 ~ 12 People 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 - 60 Minutes 60 Minutes
Ingredients
Servings: People
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350˚F and grease and flour Bundt pan or two 8 inch round baking pans or use Bakers Joy
  2. In a small mixing bowl sift together cake flour, salt, baking powder, cardamom, and saffron
  3. In a large mixing bowl cream the butter adding the sugar little by little into your mixer and mix until light and fluffy, add vanilla bean paste or vanilla extract and food coloring, incorporate completely
  4. To the creamed mixture, add the egg yolks one by one, incorporating fully after each addition. Add the orange zest.
  5. In a clean mixing bowl with a clean whisk beat the egg whites until stiff but not dry and put in the fridge until ready to use.
  6. Add the flour mixture to the creamed butter in three parts alternating with the milk and orange juice beating until smooth.
  7. Using a rubber spatula fold one quarter of the egg whites into the batter
  8. Then add the rest and continue to fold until no white streaks remain. Since I've added food color, this may take awhile. Just continue folding gently until completely incorporated.
  9. Pour batter into the bundt pan and smooth surface with spatula to even out. Bake for 35-40 minutes until golden brown and a cake tester comes out clean
  10. This cake fills your kitchen with a very pleasant and heady aroma. Watch it closely so it's not over~done.
  11. To make the glaze, make a miixture of orange juice and powdered sugar simmered in a small pan on stovetop until reduced.
  12. When the cake is done, Immediately invert cake on a cooling rack and glaze with citrus syrup; or sift powdered sugar over the top.
  13. Garnish with sweetened whipped cream, some chopped pistachios, and candied orange rind or zest and rose petals
Recipe Notes

THE HISTORY OF THE DJINN:    Jinn ~ (Redirected from Djinn)

This article is about the traditional concept.

Jinn (Arabic: الجن‎, al-jinn), also romanized as djinn or anglicized as genies, are supernatural creatures in early Arabian and later Islamic mythology and theology. An individual member of the jinn is known as a jinni, djinni, or genie (الجني, al-jinnī). They are mentioned frequently in the Quran (the 72nd sura is titled Sūrat al-Jinn) and other Islamic texts and inhabit an unseen world, another universe beyond the known universe. The Quran says that the jinn are made of a smokeless and "scorching fire", but are also physical in nature, being able to interact in a tactile manner with people and objects and likewise be acted upon. The jinn, humans, and angels make up the three known sapient creations of God. Like human beings, the jinn can be good, evil, or neutrally benevolent and hence have free will like humans.   The shaytan jinn are akin to demons in Christian tradition, but the jinn are not angels and the Quran draws a clear distinction between the two creations.

Jinn is an Arabic collective noun deriving from the Semitic root jnn (Arabic: جَنّ / جُنّ‎, jann), whose primary meaning is "to hide". Some authors interpret the word to mean, literally, "beings that are concealed from the senses".  Jinn is properly treated as a plural, with the singular being jinni.

The anglicized form genie is a borrowing of the French génie, from the Latin genius, a guardian spirit of people and places in Roman religion. It first appeared in 18th-century translations of the Thousand and One Nights from the French, where it had been used owing to its rough similarity in sound and sense.

Wikipedia

This cake was a lot of fun to make.  The look, texture and taste are beyond compare.  The addition of the saffron and cardamom give cake a whole new meaning.

This cake is simple, needs very little, if any, adornment and is well~received by those lucky enough to try it.  But, the additions and adornments is why dessert of almost any kind is appealing. Over~the~top is still okay and usually encouraged.

LINK LIST

BundtBakers

#BundtBakers is a group of Bundt loving bakers who get together once a month to bake Bundts with a common ingredient or theme.  Follow our Pinterest board right here. Links are also updated each month on the BundtBakers home page.

I failed to mention earlier that Lara of Tartacadabra came up with this wonderful theme.  Except for MY screwup, I had great fun with the theme and the final result, my fantabulous cake.  It's not only beautiful but quite delicious.  Thank you Lara, I really did enjoy your theme, so clever.

 

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