#ISW SCONE WEEK 2017 CLASSIC SNICKERS SCONES

Once again I found time to work with my favorite media, scones! For me, baking can be a very creative outlet . Above all other recipes, scones are my most adored. They come together easily and the final result is always delicious; scone recipes are quite varied from savory to cream scones to sweet scones. I especially love how scone recipes can be slightly altered, yet produce something all together unique.

This recipe is for a very dear friend’s {EXTREMELY BELATED} Birthday gift.  It is a special request scone and I know she and her Mom will really enjoy them.  I’m no longer able to jump in the car and go to Michael’s to pick up a nice presentation box and lace doily to help your scones look  more festive.   These scones barely made it out of the oven before Mr. B was asking for a sample.  While I made them specifically for my friend, I’m sure she won’t miss one or two.  I had to fight him off long enough so I could make the milk chocolate ganache.   The milk chocolate added another flavor layer to these already delicious scones.

#ISW 2017 CLASSIC SNICKERS SCONES
Print Recipe
These are light, tender and fabulous. They looked quite lovely in the presentation box. They came together quickly and although grating frozen butter was a bit of a nuisance, it made a world of difference. I think I'll continue using this technique for all my future scones. I'm going to try to use my food processor to grate the butter. A bit more to clean up after but it would certainly streamline preparing the scones for the oven. The glaze is so tasty I was tempted to eat it right out of the bowl. I highly recommend giving these a try, they are well worth the small effort they require.
Servings Prep Time
20 Mini Scones 20 Minutes {approximately}
Cook Time Passive Time
20 Minutes 40 really long Minutes
Servings Prep Time
20 Mini Scones 20 Minutes {approximately}
Cook Time Passive Time
20 Minutes 40 really long Minutes
#ISW 2017 CLASSIC SNICKERS SCONES
Print Recipe
These are light, tender and fabulous. They looked quite lovely in the presentation box. They came together quickly and although grating frozen butter was a bit of a nuisance, it made a world of difference. I think I'll continue using this technique for all my future scones. I'm going to try to use my food processor to grate the butter. A bit more to clean up after but it would certainly streamline preparing the scones for the oven. The glaze is so tasty I was tempted to eat it right out of the bowl. I highly recommend giving these a try, they are well worth the small effort they require.
Servings Prep Time
20 Mini Scones 20 Minutes {approximately}
Cook Time Passive Time
20 Minutes 40 really long Minutes
Servings Prep Time
20 Mini Scones 20 Minutes {approximately}
Cook Time Passive Time
20 Minutes 40 really long Minutes
Ingredients
Classic Snickers Scones
Milk Chocolate Glaze
  • 4 Ounces Milk chocolate Chopped
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Shortening I used solid coconut oil.
  • snickers Finely chopped for decoration and just an excuse to add more candy bar
Servings: Mini Scones
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 450º F and line a cookie sheet with parchment or use a silpat mat
  2. Stir together the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt.
  3. Grate the frozen butter on the large holes of a box grater. I tried this method last year, and it worked like a dream. Mix the flour and frozen butter with your fingers until well combined and crumbly.
  4. Whisk together the egg, buttermilk and Vanilla Bean Paste. Pour into the flour/butter mixture and stir until, until combined. The dough should look very shaggy.. Fold in the frozen, chopped Snickers.
  5. Place tablespoons of the shaggy dough into a prepared scone pan. Mine is a mini scone pan I'm particularly fond of.
  6. If any Snickers are poking out of the dough, poke them back in to avoid the caramel oozing and burning while baking.
  7. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, until golden. After 10 minutes, switch the scone pan around so the front becomes the back. Remove from baking sheet or pan and allow to cool on a wire cooling rack.
  8. While the scones are cooling, make the glaze. Melt the chopped milk chocolate and coconut oil (solid) in the microwave on 50% power for 30 second intervals. Stir after each interval, until melted. Drizzle lavishly delicious glaze over baked scones. Sprinkle finely chopped, frozen, Snickers over the milk chocolate glaze. [sheer perfection}. Even though they are a gift, I'm going to snatch a couple for my evening tea. Can't wait.
Recipe Notes

I have  always been a fan of Snickers candy bars but when they started producing  them with different nuts, I just about lost it.  My personal choice is still Almond Snickers but I'm crazy about this candy bar in any flavor.  There is no better way to enjoy them when baked into a light, flakey scone..  They are after all "a bit of Heaven in your hand" (to quote a very bright gal, me).  This recipe gave me 20 mini scones plus an additional four on a baking sheet.  They are so rich and delectable that a mini scone is just right to satisfy, but, two are just that much tastier.🐝💜

A scone is a single-serving quick bread/cake, usually made of wheat, barley or oatmeal with baking powder as a leavening agent and baked on sheet pans. A scone is often lightly sweetened and occasionally glazed with egg wash.  The scone is a basic component of the cream tea or Devonshire tea. It differs from teacakes and other sweet buns that are made with yeast.

The pronunciation of the word within the English-speaking world varies. According to one academic study, two-thirds of the British population pronounce it /ˈskɒn/ (rhymes with gone) with the preference rising to 99% in the Scottish population.  This is also the pronunciation in Ulster, as well as among Australians and Canadians. Others, including natives of the Republic of Ireland and the United States, pronounce the word as /ˈskoʊn/ (rhymes with tone).  British dictionaries usually show the /ˈskɒn/ form as the preferred pronunciation, while recognising the /ˈskoʊn/ form.

The Oxford Dictionaries explain that there are also regional and class differences in England connected with the different pronunciations:

There are two possible pronunciations of the word scone: the first rhymes with gone and the second rhymes with tone. In US English, the pronunciation rhyming with tone is more common. In British English, the two pronunciations traditionally have different regional and class associations, with the first pronunciation associated with the north of England, while the second is associated with the south.

The difference in pronunciation is alluded to in a poem:

I asked the maid in dulcet tone
To order me a buttered scone;
The silly girl has been and gone
And ordered me a buttered scone.

The Oxford English Dictionary reports that the first mention of the word was in 1513. Origin of the word scone is obscure and may, in fact, derive from different sources. That is, the classic Scottish scone which, according to Sheila MacNiven Cameron in The Highlander's Cookbook, originated as a bannock cut into pieces; and the Dutch schoonbrood or "spoonbread" (very similar to the drop scone); and possibly other, similar and similarly named quick breads, may have made their way onto the British tea table, where their similar names merged into one.

Thus, scone may derive from the Middle Dutch schoonbrood (fine white bread), from schoon (pure, clean) and brood (bread),  and/or it may also derive from the Scots Gaelic term sgonn meaning a shapeless mass or large mouthful. The Middle Low German term schöne meaning fine bread may also have played a role in the origination of this word. And if the explanation put forward by Sheila MacNiven Cameron be true, the word may also be based on the town of Scone (/ˈskuːn/) (Scots: Scuin, Scottish Gaelic: Sgàin) in Scotland, the ancient capital of that country – where Scottish monarchs were still crowned, even after the capital was moved to Perth, then to Edinburgh (and on whose Scone Stone the monarchs of the United Kingdom are still crowned today).  I found information on line and looked into, applied and was accepted as a Scone.  So, I am a Scone.

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#BUNDTBAKERS APPLE~CREAM CHEESE BUNDT CAKE

This is my second try this month, I don’t know how it happened but in my opinion, my first one was not suitable for anything other than the garbage disposal. It very well could have been Operator error. This one went together nice and smooth. While the ingredient list may make seem intimidating, it’s really very easy to pull this delicious bundt cake out of your own oven.

This tasty morsel has been adapted from Baked by Rachel and I want to thank her for this little beauty.   Our theme this month is apples. I know there are hundreds of Apple bundt cake recipes but this one really struck me. Maybe it’s  the spice combinations but I couldn’t resist.   Thanks and much gratitude to Wendy of A Day In The Life On A Farm. Apples is such a nice idea since they are so versatile to work with. Lots and lots of recipes. The hard part was choosing the one for me to bake and enjoy.  Good job Wendy!

 

#BUNDTBAKERS APPLE~CREAM CHEESE BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
This one made the kitchen smell fabulous. Ohhh~Kay, here she is. After only two attempts, this one came out beautifully. I was pretty disheartened when my first attempt failed so miserably. But, going forward, with plenty of determination, a second recipe and plenty of time, it turned out alright. This cake is sweet, tender, flavorful and spicey. I would have no problem offering it as an alternative to pumpkin pie; move over Thanksgiving for something different and delicious.
Servings Prep Time
1 Large Bundt 35 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
60 ~ 75 Minutes 2 + Hours
Servings Prep Time
1 Large Bundt 35 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
60 ~ 75 Minutes 2 + Hours
#BUNDTBAKERS APPLE~CREAM CHEESE BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
This one made the kitchen smell fabulous. Ohhh~Kay, here she is. After only two attempts, this one came out beautifully. I was pretty disheartened when my first attempt failed so miserably. But, going forward, with plenty of determination, a second recipe and plenty of time, it turned out alright. This cake is sweet, tender, flavorful and spicey. I would have no problem offering it as an alternative to pumpkin pie; move over Thanksgiving for something different and delicious.
Servings Prep Time
1 Large Bundt 35 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
60 ~ 75 Minutes 2 + Hours
Servings Prep Time
1 Large Bundt 35 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
60 ~ 75 Minutes 2 + Hours
Ingredients
The Filling
The Cake
The Praline Frosting
Servings: Large Bundt
Instructions
Filling
  1. Preheat oven to 300º F
  2. To make the filling. Add cream cheese, butter, and sugar to the bowl of your stand mixer, fitted with paddle attachment
  3. Beat at medium speed until well combined and smooth.
  4. Add the egg, flour and vanilla and continue beating just until incorporated. Set aside.
  5. Place the pecans on a rimmed baking sheet and toast in the oven for about 10 minutes or just until fragrant. Remove baking sheet to a wire rack to cool.
  6. In a large bowl, whisk the flour, both sugars, the cinnamon, salt, baking soda, nutmeg and allspice together.
  7. Add the eggs, oil, applesauce and vanilla and mix just until combined. It is recommended to use a whisk then switch to a spatula.
  8. Fold in the toasted pecans and chopped apples until distributed throughout the batter.
  9. Spoon 1/2 to 2/3 of the cake batter into the prepared bundt cake. Top evenly with cream cheese filling leaving a 1 inch border around the edge of the pan. This can be a little tricky, just do your best. Use a thin paring knife to swirl the cream cheese filling with the cake batter, just a few times ~ less is more. Top the filling with the rest of the cake batter.
  10. Bake at 300ºF for 30 minutes then increase the heat to 350ºF for an additional 45 minutes or until your cake tester comes out clean.
  11. Transfer the cake pan to a cooling rack for about 15 minutes, then invert cake onto a cooling rack and allow to cool completely {at least 2 hours}
Frosting
  1. Combine brown sugar, butter, and milk into a saucepan. Set over medium heat and bring to a boil, whisking almost constantly. Boil for 1 minute whisking constantly.
  2. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the vanilla.
  3. Whisk in the confectioners sugar, a little at a time until it is completely incorporated and the frosting is smooth.
  4. Gently stir the frosting until it starts to thicken, then pour it over the cooled cake. The frosting will set up quickly, so don't make it in advance. Also be very careful as I am sporting a small scar from my last praline recipe.
  5. Be certain to wait until the cake has cooled completely {at least 2 hours} before starting the frosting as it sets up quickly. Garnish with extra pecans if desired.
Recipe Notes

Johnny Appleseed
John Chapman (September 26, 1774 – March 18, 1845), often called Johnny Appleseed, was an American pioneer nurseryman who introduced apple trees to large parts of Pennsylvania, Ontario, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, as well as the northern counties of present-day West Virginia.
Parent(s)‎: ‎Nathaniel Chapman; Elizabeth Simonds‎
Nationality‎: ‎American‎
Occupation‎: ‎Missionary and gardener‎ 💜

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BundtBakers

#BundtBakers is a group of Bundt loving bakers who get together once a month to bake Bundts with a common ingredient or theme. Follow our Pinterest board right here. Links are also updated each month on the BundtBakers home page.

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SOUTHERN PECAN PRALINE SCONES

This recipe makes 10 ~ 12 large or 2 dozen petite scones that will tantalize your tastebuds. In my opinion, there isn’t much out there to equal the delight of a well~made scone. No doubt, these fit the bill to a “T”. Light, flakey, sweet, all I aim for in my scone and it’s all right here.

Savory scones also have a place at the top of my favorite things, as in the first course. But, the “dessert” scone is my preference every time. Morning, noon or night, scones always fit in. Just add tea.

image

First and foremost, thanks to Peanut Butter & Julie {clever name} for this fantastic recipe I adapted.  Of course I was drawn in right from the get~go.  The name seems simple; “Southern”, that almost always denotes something delicious.  “Pecan” always equals crunchy and yummy.  “Praline”, that’s got to be great, it’s sweet candy and I love candy in all forms.  And finally, “Scones” ~ ooh scones.  I do not need to know anything else but when are they done?    As an aside, I liked the praline so much I doubled the recipe to add to my upcoming Chocolate Salami.  That’s just a teaser.

I really enjoyed making these, especially since they are the flagship of “Scone Sunday”, my new project.  I can’t very well have a website called The Queen of Scones without living up to certain expectations, which led me directly to Scone Sunday.  The plan is to offer at least one scone recipe each week.  Sometimes sweet, sometimes savory but always a bit of Heaven in your hand.

Once I get more proficient and properly established (a finished website for instance.  Please forgive the “under construction” mode, I’m afraid I’ll be here for awhile).   There’s much more technical computer knowledge needed than I thought, quite a lot more than I have.  I hope to generate enough income to pay for necessary upgrades and a web designer; buts that’s pretty far off in the future I’m afraid.  So for now, I’ll just muddle through and do the best I can.  May I request your patience as I sort things out like why I have Twitter highlighted 3 different times.  I know just one would be sufficient.  Blazingly loud  bugs to sort out.  Hmmmph!

By the way, what do you think of my logo,  Sassy the “Queen Bee”?  I love her, she has enough attitude to make her interesting but cute enough to see her all over my website.  So I say, let’s get to it.

SOUTHERN PECAN PRALINE SCONES
Print Recipe
10 ~ 12 large or 2 dozen petite scones that will tantalize your tastebuds. In my opinion, there isn't much out there to equal the delight of a well~made scone. No doubt, these fit the bill to a "T". Light, flakey, sweet, all I aim for in my scone and it's all right here. Savory scones also have a place at the top of my favorite things, as in the first course. But, the "dessert" scone is my preference every time. Morning, noon or night, scones always fit in. Just add tea.
Servings Prep Time
1~ 2 Dozen 60 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20 ~ 25 Minutes 45 Minutes Cooling time for the pralines
Servings Prep Time
1~ 2 Dozen 60 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20 ~ 25 Minutes 45 Minutes Cooling time for the pralines
SOUTHERN PECAN PRALINE SCONES
Print Recipe
10 ~ 12 large or 2 dozen petite scones that will tantalize your tastebuds. In my opinion, there isn't much out there to equal the delight of a well~made scone. No doubt, these fit the bill to a "T". Light, flakey, sweet, all I aim for in my scone and it's all right here. Savory scones also have a place at the top of my favorite things, as in the first course. But, the "dessert" scone is my preference every time. Morning, noon or night, scones always fit in. Just add tea.
Servings Prep Time
1~ 2 Dozen 60 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20 ~ 25 Minutes 45 Minutes Cooling time for the pralines
Servings Prep Time
1~ 2 Dozen 60 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20 ~ 25 Minutes 45 Minutes Cooling time for the pralines
Ingredients
For the Pralines
For the Scones
Servings: Dozen
Instructions
Pecan Pralines
  1. Prepare the pecan pralines: In a medium saucepan, combine the brown sugar, milk, butter, vanilla, cinnamon, and salt. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium heat, stirring constantly so the sugar dissolves. Add the chopped pecans to the mixture and continue to boil for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Drop the mixture by heaping tablespoonsful onto parchment-lined baking sheets; allow to cool completely. When the pralines have hardened, break into small chunks or roughly chop.
Scones
  1. Preheat the oven to 375F degrees. Place oven racks in the upper and lower third positions of the oven.
  2. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in your food processor. Pulse to combine. Scatter the butter pieces over the flour mixture and pulse several times until the mixture resembles coarse meal. I ended up doing this by hand and I believe it worked better than the stand mixer.
  3. Transfer the mixture to a large bowl and stir in the chopped praline pieces. {we sampled a few just to be sure they were okay}. Add the buttermilk, mixing until just combined. If the scone dough is too dry after adding the buttermilk, then add a few tablespoons more. The dough should be evenly moist, but not overly sticky and wet.
  4. Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface and gently knead a few times to bring the dough together. Be careful not to overwork the dough.
  5. Divide the dough in half and pat it into two rounds, about 1-inch thick. Cut each round into 6 wedges and place the wedges on the prepared baking sheets.
  6. Brush the tops of the scones with the egg wash. Bake the scones for 20-25 minutes, rotating positions halfway through the baking process, until they are golden brown and a toothpick inserted into the center emerges clean.
  7. Because the praline pieces can melt a bit while the scones are baking, some of them may seep around the bottom edges. If this area starts to burn, you can either remove it with a knife or a spoon, or you can tent the scones loosely with foil for the remainder of the baking period. I wanted to refrigerate the scones awhile before baking to help eliminate the problem but was rushed as we're celebrating Mr. Bee's Mother's 89th birthday and I wanted to take her one. Fortunately, the melting bits were not an issue. The are LARGE scones. Feel free to cut them in half to yield 2 dozen.
  8. This scones dough can be prepared 1 day in advance and refrigerated, tightly wrapped.
  9. You can also pre-cut the scone shapes and freeze them. Thaw in the refrigerator overnight and bake as directed.
  10. Fully baked scones can also be frozen, tightly wrapped, for up to one week. Thaw at room temperature and reheat. 💜
  11. Side Note: I want to issue a clear warning here, the praline burns ALOT so be cautious. I know cooked sugar is especially hot but from very recent personal experience {that's gonna blister} be very careful dropping the hot pralines onto the parchment.
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