NATIONAL BUNDT CAKE DAY ~ AMARULA BUNDT CAKE

I don’t think the average bear person keeps this Cream Liqueur on hand and I wanted to be asauthenticate as possible with the ingredients. I also had to get some caramel essence as frankly, I didn’t know what it was. I wondered if I could have just used homemade caramel in its place. I’ll let you know the outcome.

THE AFRICAN LEGEND
Storytelling has always been central to African life. The Marula tree, as the source of several fascinating legends, has become a sacred and intricate part of ancient African culture. Locals have revered these trees for centuries and refer to them fondly by various names.

Because elephants travel for miles to feast on the wild fruit, locals call it ‘The Elephant Tree’. African folklore also refers to it as ‘The Marriage Tree’. Apart from making a beautifully natural wedding canopy, it’s also said to have aphrodisiac properties and features in tribal fertility rites. The ripening of the Marula fruit in summer coincides with great celebrations in many parts of Southern Africa. In Swaziland, for example, the annual Marula Festival is celebrated at the king’s royal residence, sustaining the belief that the Marula fruit is fit for kings and queens.

Like the elephants, the Marula trees are protected under South African law. They are a key part of African heritage and may not be farmed for commerce. The fruit however is sold in a variety of natural products, Amarula of course being one of them.

NATIONAL BUNDT CAKE DAY ~ AMARULA BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
This cake is moist, has a tender crumb and a unique, almost addicting flavor. I knew I had to make it from the get go. It drew me in right from the start. After all was said and done, I was not disappointed and will surely make this again, for a special occasion.
Servings
8 ~ 10 Servings
Cook Time Passive Time
50 ~ 60 Minutes 4 Hours
Servings
8 ~ 10 Servings
Cook Time Passive Time
50 ~ 60 Minutes 4 Hours
NATIONAL BUNDT CAKE DAY ~ AMARULA BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
This cake is moist, has a tender crumb and a unique, almost addicting flavor. I knew I had to make it from the get go. It drew me in right from the start. After all was said and done, I was not disappointed and will surely make this again, for a special occasion.
Servings
8 ~ 10 Servings
Cook Time Passive Time
50 ~ 60 Minutes 4 Hours
Servings
8 ~ 10 Servings
Cook Time Passive Time
50 ~ 60 Minutes 4 Hours
Ingredients
THE BUNDT CAKE
GANACHE & ASSEMBLY
Servings: Servings
Instructions
BUNDT CAKE
  1. Pre~heat oven to 350ºF and prepare a medium Bundt pan with cake release. My Homemade release has never let me down, no matter how intricate the design.
  2. Sift together, the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in a large mixing bowl. Whisk to combine.
  3. In the bowl of your stand mixer, beat together the melted butter, milk, 4 Tablespoons Amarula Liqueur, eggs and caramel essence until light and fluffy.
  4. Add dry ingredients and fold together by hand just until combined. DO NOT OVERMIX
  5. Pour batter into prepared Bundt pan, smooth on top and rap on the counter a few times to release any unwanted bubbles
  6. Bake in pre~heated oven for 50 to 60 minutes or until a finger pressed on the top of the cake springs right back up; and a tester comes out with just a few moist crumbs.
  7. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack 5 to 10 minutes
  8. Un~mold Bundt cake onto a wire rack with parchment or waxed paper underneath to catch any dripping.
  9. Using a skewer, pierce the cake in several places over the top of the cake. Heat 4 Tablespoons heavy whipping cream and 2 Tablespoons Amarula Liqueur just until warm ~ slowly pour over the cake and allow to cool completely.
GANACHE AND ASSEMBLY
  1. Once the cake has completely cooled, Combine the chopped milk chocolate, 1 Tablespoon heavy whipping cream and 2 Tablespoons Amarula Liqueur in a microwave~safe bowl. Heat in microwave on 75% power in 20 second intervals, stirring in between until completely smooth and melted. Pour over cake, followed by sprinkling the chopped pecans over the top of the cake; and dust with icing sugar, if desired.
Recipe Notes

Total  Trivia:

The United States has over 175 days related to awareness of food or drink.  None of these are federal holidays.

THE AFRICAN LEGEND
Storytelling has always been central to African life. The Marula tree, as the source of several fascinating legends, has become a sacred and intricate part of ancient African culture. Locals have revered these trees for centuries and refer to them fondly by various names.

Because elephants travel for miles to feast on the wild fruit, locals call it ‘The Elephant Tree’. African folklore also refers to it as ‘The Marriage Tree’. Apart from making a beautifully natural wedding canopy, it’s also said to have aphrodisiac properties and features in tribal fertility rites. The ripening of the Marula fruit in summer coincides with great celebrations in many parts of Southern Africa. In Swaziland, for example, the annual Marula Festival is celebrated at the king’s royal residence, sustaining the belief that the Marula fruit is fit for kings and queens.

Like the elephants, the Marula trees are protected under South African law. They are a key part of African heritage and may not be farmed for commerce. The fruit however is sold in a variety of natural products, Amarula of course being one of them.

Amarula {my new obsession} is a cream liqueur from South Africa. It is made with sugar, cream and the fruit of the African marula tree (Sclerocarya birrea) which is also locally called the Elephant tree or the Marriage Tree. It has an alcohol content of 17% by volume. It has had some success at international spirit ratings competitions, winning a gold medal at the 2006 San Francisco World Spirits Competition.

History:

Amarula was first marketed by Southern Liqueur Company of South Africa (the current trademark owners and wholly owned subsidiary of Distell Group Limited) as a liqueur in September 1989, the Amarula spirit having been launched in 1983.  It has the taste of slightly fruity caramel.

Distribution:

Amarula has had particular success in Brazil [and in Chandler, Arizona ] just kidding {not really}. Recently, Amarula has attempted to break into the American market.

Elephant-associated marketing:

Elephants enjoy eating the fruit of the marula tree. Because of the marula tree's association with elephants, the distiller has made them its symbol and supports elephant conservation efforts, co-funding the Amarula Elephant Research Programme at the University of Natal, Durban.   For marketing efforts it produces elephant-themed collectible items.

Just once a year, the Marula trees bear fruit. The elephants are drawn by the exotic scent and travel for miles to get a taste. That’s when we know it’s time to hand-harvest the ripe, yellow fruit and begin the two-year process that brings the unique taste of Amarula to the world.  The elephants get a little drunk from it and once you try it, you’ll see for yourself why they travel so far to enjoy it to the fullest.  There are videos of the elephants consuming the fruit and staggering around in a bit of drunken stupor.  None have been “carded” to my knowledge.

~ ~ ~ WIKIPEDIA {mostly} 🐝💜

* use any Cream Liqueur if Amarula is unavailable. I had to special order mine and picked it up the next day. According to the internet, it was only available by order and the one store had just a few bottles in stock kept in the back.  Now that I have tasted it, and really enjoyed it, I hope to expand my number of Amarula recipes.  Apparently, it can be used in lots of different recipes.  I’m going to do a little R & D of my own to develop a new recipe using this delightful cream liqueur.  Look for it in the upcoming weeks.

Well, got her mixed and in the oven.  This cake is quite simple to pull together and tasting the batter, I can’t wait to dive in.  As an aside, caramel essence tastes about as good as vanilla right out of the bottle.  I’m certain it will do the desired job on the final cake flavor though.

adapted. Fromwww. withablast.net

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#BUNDT BAKERS BOSTON CREAM~FILLED BUNDT CAKE ** double the Sponge recipe

I consider this recipe a bit labor intensive but after tasting the completed cake, it’s worth the effort. After sampling, It is definitely one of my favorites. But in all honesty, I won’t be turning this out unless it’s for a special occasion. The cake is, in my opinion, simply fabulous. I suggest doubling the cake recipe to create a larger cake.

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First and foremost, a great big thank you hug for this fun and tasty theme,  “Filled Bundt Cakes”.   This months recipes are brought to you by           Christina Lopez Vera of Bizcocheando and Patricia at Pattys Cake.           And, thanks especially for the translation.

It didn’t take me long to figure out what cake to bake.  I just went straight to the horse’s mouth, Mr. Bee, he knew right off what he wanted this month and I like to include his favorites for him.  This Boston Creme~Filled Bundt Cake will definitely be added to his favorites list.  I’m already sampling that chocolate drizzle in my dreams.

Now, Boston Cream Pie is not a difficult cake to bake but turning it into a Bundt took a little research and reading potential recipes. This recipe is adapted from several recipes, including  “Unsophisticook.com and The Cake Book”.   Great start!   Now if you know anything about me {and if you are following me, you would already know a few of my simple rules}.  If not, please come join me.  I’m not a proliferate Pinner but what I lack in numbers of pins, I make up for it with enthusiastic fervor.   My homemade recipes are really very good.

I prefer baking from scratch.  Yes, I have used boxed cakes plenty of times, but  I consider #Bundt Bakers more than worthy of offering a scratch- baked Bundt as opposed to cake mix. I really wanted to make it special because my daughter arrives on Tuesday along with my two granddaughters.  Two weeks of Heaven in my house…….

I much prefer heavy whipping cream to any “fake” whipped cream product.    So, {a} heavy whipping cream instead of cool whip}; { b} No instant pudding, just a perfect custard, using Bird’s custard mix or your own favorite filling or use the one provided in this recipe.  It’s fast, easy and tastes absolutely great;  and [c} Homemade rather than “store-bought cake mix”.  There is a big  difference between the pre-made in all of my three “almost-scratch” choices.

This hot milk cake is the perfect recipe for this yummy morsel.  This recipe makes up a small cake and next time,  ** I will definitely double the recipe.  Now, add the homemade Custard and finishing touch of irresistible chocolate and I’m your girl.

 

 

 

#BUNDT BAKERS BOSTON CREAM~FILLED BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
This recipe requires some advance planning, as the cake has to cool completely before it is filled and frosted. This hot milk cake is the perfect recipe for this yummy morsel. This recipe makes up a small cake and next time, I will definitely double the recipe. Now, add the homemade Custard and finishing touch of irresistible chocolate and I'm your girl.
Servings Prep Time
6 Servings 30 ~ 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20~25 Minutes 1 ~ 2 hours Set up
Servings Prep Time
6 Servings 30 ~ 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20~25 Minutes 1 ~ 2 hours Set up
#BUNDT BAKERS BOSTON CREAM~FILLED BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
This recipe requires some advance planning, as the cake has to cool completely before it is filled and frosted. This hot milk cake is the perfect recipe for this yummy morsel. This recipe makes up a small cake and next time, I will definitely double the recipe. Now, add the homemade Custard and finishing touch of irresistible chocolate and I'm your girl.
Servings Prep Time
6 Servings 30 ~ 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20~25 Minutes 1 ~ 2 hours Set up
Servings Prep Time
6 Servings 30 ~ 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20~25 Minutes 1 ~ 2 hours Set up
Ingredients
Hot Milk Sponge Cake
Vanilla Custard Filling
Chocolate Ganache Drizzle
Servings: Servings
Instructions
Hot Milk Sponge Cake
  1. Preheat oven to 350º degrees and prepare baking pan with homemade cake release, or Bakers Joy
  2. Sift the cake flour, baking powder and salt twice. Set aside. In a small saucepan, combine the milk, and butter and heat over medium heat just until the butter is melted. Remove the pan from heat and set aside.
  3. Using the whisk attachment on your stand mixer, beat the eggs at high speed until blended. About 1 minute.
  4. Gradually add in granulated sugar and vanilla extract and beat until pale and tripled in volume, about 6 minutes.
  5. Sift 1/3 cup of flour mixture over the egg mixture and GENTLY fold in with a rubber spatula. Repeat with the remaining flour in two more additions. Do not over~fold or you will deflate the mixture.
  6. Reheat the milk mixture to just under a boil. Add it all at once to the egg mixture and gently fold it in.
  7. Pour the combined mixture into a prepared Bundt cake pan, and gently tap the pan on on the counter, several times, to release any large air bubbles
  8. Bake the cake on the lowest rack of the oven at 350º degrees for approximately 20 to 25 minutes until it springs back when lightly touched and a cake tester inserted into the center comes out clean. Cool the cake in the pan on a wire rack for 10 minutes.
  9. Remove from the Bundt pan and reinvert the cake so it is right side up to finish cooling on a wire rack.
  10. I froze my cake for easier handling. After the cake is about half~way thawed, cut the cake horizontally. While you are waiting for the cake to finish defrosting, it's a dandy time to make the Custard.
  11. When the cake is mostly thawed, use a small paring knife and a teaspoon to dig a good sized trench in the top and bottom cake layers to give you more filling space.
Vanilla Custard Filling
  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together the egg yolks, sugar and the cornstarch, set aside
  2. In a medium sauce pan, bring the milk to a gentle boil. Remove the pan from the heat and whisk about 1/3 cup of the hot milk into the yolk mixture. Return the entire mixture to the sauce pan, place over medium high heat and bring to a boil, whisking constantly for one minute. Remove the pan from the heat and scrape the bottom of the pan with a spatula and whisk until smooth. Whisk in the butter until completely melted .
  3. Immediately strain the custard through a fine mesh sieve into a medium bowl . Whisk in the vanilla extract. Cover the surface of the custard with plastic wrap and let cool to room temperature then refrigerate for two hours or until well chilled.
  4. Just before assembling the cake, transfer the custard filling to the bowl of your stand mixer. Add 1/4 cup heavy whipping cream and using the whisk attachment on your mixer beat the mixture at high speed until it is light and forms into soft peaks about one minute.
Chocolate Drizzle
  1. In a small sauce pan, (or in the microwave). bring the cream to a boil. Remove from the heat and add the chopped chocolate to the pan. Stir until the chocolate is completely melted and the glaze is smooth. Stir in the vanilla extract. Transfer the glaze to a small bowl , cover the surface of the glaze with a piece of plastic wrap and let cool for about 10 minutes before using.
Assembling the cake
  1. I froze my cake, well-wrapped in plastic wrap, to allow it to firm up before I attempted to cut into it.
  2. Allow it to come to almost room temperature, but still a bit firm. Using a long serrated knife, cut the cake horizontally in half to make two layers.
  3. Place the bottom half of the cake cut side up on a serving plate. Using a small paring knife and a teaspoon carve around the inside edges of the cake leaving a border of cake and scrape out a little bit of the cake with your teaspoon. Make a nice "trench" on both halves to allow for a generous portion of custard.
  4. Now, spread the filling onto the bottom layer and using a small offset spatula spread it into an even layer in the trench that you've dug in the bottom half. Repeat this technique to the cut side of the top layer to allow for plenty of Custard filling.
  5. Add more custard to the small trench you made with a teaspoon and very carefully add the filled top to the filled bottom layer on your serving dish.
Glaze the cake
  1. Pour the warm glaze over the top of the cake allowing some of it to artisticly drizzle down the sides serve the cake immediately or refrigerate.
  2. Store in refrigerator in a covered container for up to a day before serving. Bring to room temperature before serving.
  3. Note: the Custard can be made ahead of time stored carefully with plastic wrap form fitted over the top of the custard.
  4. Note: that Hot Milk Sponge can be made a day or two before serving. This will allow time for the cake to firm up in the freezer for easier assembly.
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#BundtBakers White Chocolate Bundt Cake With Raspberry Glaze And Fresh Raspberries

Since I decided to make an extra special cake for our anniversary, I really wanted to make the tastiest cake in my repertoire. This recipe is adapted from both Bettycrocker.com and Food.com. I put it all together and baked it up in my new Bundt pan that I’ve been coveting since I first saw it. Hopefully, you’ll agree this bundt is spectacular.

Our theme for February is “Red”.  In addition to St. Valentines Day, its Mr. B’s and my anniversary on February 10, so this cake was an extra special treat for me to research, prepare and enjoy.

Heartfelt appreciation  to Wendy Klik  from  A Day in the Life on the Farm for this “red” treat.  I really had a good time deciding which cake to make and the choice was not easy.  I had a good idea of what I wanted for the finished cake and drew from a couple different recipes to make this, my own creation.

At this time, I would like to add that while it may appear difficult with a long list of ingredients, it is really straightforward.  And even though a tad labor intensive,  it is WELL worth it.  It’s quite delicious and perfect for any celebration.

#BundtBakers White Chocolate Bundt Cake With Raspberry Glaze And Fresh Raspberries
Print Recipe
A beautiful, lightly almond-scented, white chocolate bundt cake with luscious white chocolate baked throughout the cake itself and a white chocolate ganache decoratively drizzled on top. Finished with a raspberry glaze, and dollops of whipped cream and fresh raspberries to complete my masterpiece. It's rich, chocolaty and fabulous, in my opinion.
Servings Prep Time
12-15 Servings 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
55-60 Minutes 15 -75 Minutes
Servings Prep Time
12-15 Servings 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
55-60 Minutes 15 -75 Minutes
#BundtBakers White Chocolate Bundt Cake With Raspberry Glaze And Fresh Raspberries
Print Recipe
A beautiful, lightly almond-scented, white chocolate bundt cake with luscious white chocolate baked throughout the cake itself and a white chocolate ganache decoratively drizzled on top. Finished with a raspberry glaze, and dollops of whipped cream and fresh raspberries to complete my masterpiece. It's rich, chocolaty and fabulous, in my opinion.
Servings Prep Time
12-15 Servings 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
55-60 Minutes 15 -75 Minutes
Servings Prep Time
12-15 Servings 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
55-60 Minutes 15 -75 Minutes
Ingredients
The Bundt cake
White Chocolate Ganache
Raspberry Glaze
Topping
Servings: Servings
Instructions
White Chocolate Bundt Cake
  1. Preheat oven to 350º degrees. Prepare a 10-inch Bundt pan with homemade cake release or use food release spray for baking, and dust with two tablespoons sugar. Be sure to tap out the excess sugar. I was not careful enough, in my opinion. And it looks like excess flour caked on the Bundt. It's actually sugar not tapped out. While it may appear a bit unsightly, it will only sweeten the finished Bundt. The sugar coating adds a very nice crunch to the finished cake. Here is my spectacular new Bundt cake pan. Don't you just love the final, gorgeous Bundt cake it produces?
  2. In a medium bowl, combine flour, baking powder, salt and baking powder. Set aside.
  3. Chop 8 ounces of baking white chocolate. Reserve 4 ounces of the chopped chocolate to be added to the cake before baking. Melt the other 4 ounces and set aside.
  4. In the mixing bowl of your stand mixer, cream butter and remaining sugar until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, incorporating well after each addition.
  5. Stir extracts and the melted white chocolate and flour mixture into the creamed mixture alternating with the sour cream. Beat just until combined.
  6. Pour 1/3 of the batter into your prepared bundt cake pan. Sprinkle 1/2 of the reserved chopped white chocolate on top of the batter. Repeat and Pour the remaining (1/3) batter on top.
  7. Bake for 55 to 60 minutes or until your cake tester comes out clean. I turned the pan at 30 minutes to facilitate an even bake.
  8. Let cake cool in pan for 15 minutes, then remove from pan to a rack and allow to cool completely.
White Chocolate Ganache
  1. Place 8 ounces of chopped white chocolate baking bar pieces in a small bowl, set aside
  2. Bring 1/2 Cup whipping cream and 1 Tablespoon butter just to a boil.
  3. Pour over chopped white chocolate pieces and stir until smooth. Cool completely, about 5 minutes. Then refrigerate 1 hour until thoroughly chilled
Raspberry Glaze
  1. Place a strainer over a saucepan; pour thawed raspberries into strainer and press the berries with the back of a spoon through the strainer to remove seeds. Discard seeds.
  2. Stir Raspberry juice with cornstarch and sugar. Blend well and cook over medium heat until the mixture boils and thickens, STIRRING CONSTANTLY. The raspberry juice is a bit tart so I added a touch of sugar. The remaining tart flavor is a nice balance to the sweet cake. Cool about 30 minutes or until completely cooled.
Assembly
  1. Drizzle melted and cooled white chocolate ganache over the bundt cake and give it awhile to set up. Then, spread the raspberry glaze on top of the ganache. Refrigerate at least 30 minutes before serving
Serving my masterpiece
  1. Whip 1 cup heavy whipping cream, add sugar to taste and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract until stiff peaks form.
  2. Add dollops of whipped cream over the glaze and finish with fresh raspberries. Serve and enjoy your masterpiece.
Recipe Notes

~The History Channel~

Every February 14, across the United States and in other places around the world, candy, flowers and gifts are exchanged between loved ones, all in the name of St. Valentine. But who is this mysterious saint, and where did these traditions come from? Find out about the history of this centuries-old holiday, from ancient Roman rituals to the customs of Victorian England.

THE LEGEND OF ST. VALENTINE

The history of Valentine’s Day–and the story of its patron saint–is shrouded in mystery. We do know that February has long been celebrated as a month of romance, and that St. Valentine’s Day, as we know it today, contains vestiges of both Christian and ancient Roman tradition. But who was Saint Valentine, and how did he become associated with this ancient rite?

Did You Know?
Approximately 150 million Valentine's Day cards are exchanged annually, making Valentine's Day the second most popular card-sending holiday after Christmas.

The Catholic Church recognizes at least three different saints named Valentine or Valentinus, all of whom were martyred. One legend contends that Valentine was a priest who served during the third century in Rome. When Emperor Claudius II decided that single men made better soldiers than those with wives and families, he outlawed marriage for young men. Valentine, realizing the injustice of the decree, defied Claudius and continued to perform marriages for young lovers in secret. When Valentine’s actions were discovered, Claudius ordered that he be put to death.

Other stories suggest that Valentine may have been killed for attempting to help Christians escape harsh Roman prisons, where they were often beaten and tortured. According to one legend, an imprisoned Valentine actually sent the first “valentine” greeting himself after he fell in love with a young girl–possibly his jailor’s daughter–who visited him during his confinement. Before his death, it is alleged that he wrote her a letter signed “From your Valentine,” an expression that is still in use today. Although the truth behind the Valentine legends is murky, the stories all emphasize his appeal as a sympathetic, heroic and–most importantly–romantic figure. By the Middle Ages, perhaps thanks to this reputation, Valentine would become one of the most popular saints in England and France.

ORIGINS OF VALENTINE’S DAY: A PAGAN FESTIVAL IN FEBRUARY

While some believe that Valentine’s Day is celebrated in the middle of February to commemorate the anniversary of Valentine’s death or burial–which probably occurred around A.D. 270–others claim that the Christian church may have decided to place St. Valentine’s feast day in the middle of February in an effort to “Christianize” the pagan celebration of Lupercalia. Celebrated at the ides of February, or February 15, Lupercalia was a fertility festival dedicated to Faunus, the Roman god of agriculture, as well as to the Roman founders Romulus and Remus.

To begin the festival, members of the Luperci, an order of Roman priests, would gather at a sacred cave where the infants Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome, were believed to have been cared for by a she-wolf or lupa. The priests would sacrifice a goat, for fertility, and a dog, for purification. They would then strip the goat’s hide into strips, dip them into the sacrificial blood and take to the streets, gently slapping both women and crop fields with the goat hide. Far from being fearful, Roman women welcomed the touch of the hides because it was believed to make them more fertile in the coming year. Later in the day, according to legend, all the young women in the city would place their names in a big urn. The city’s bachelors would each choose a name and become paired for the year with his chosen woman. These matches often ended in marriage.

VALENTINE’S DAY: A DAY OF ROMANCE

Lupercalia survived the initial rise of Christianity and but was outlawed—as it was deemed “un-Christian”–at the end of the 5th century, when Pope Gelasius declared February 14 as St. Valentine’s Day. It was not until much later, however, that the day became definitively associated with love. During the Middle Ages, it was commonly believed in France and England that February 14 was the beginning of birds’ mating season, which added to the idea that the middle of Valentine’s Day should be a day for romance.

Valentine greetings were popular as far back as the Middle Ages, though written Valentine’s didn’t begin to appear until after 1400. The oldest known valentine still in existence today was a poem written in 1415 by Charles, Duke of Orleans, to his wife while he was imprisoned in the Tower of London following his capture at the Battle of Agincourt. (The greeting is now part of the manuscript collection of the British Library in London, England.) Several years later, it is believed that King Henry V hired a writer named John Lydgate to compose a valentine note to Catherine of Valois.

TYPICAL VALENTINE’S DAY GREETINGS

In addition to the United States, Valentine’s Day is celebrated in Canada, Mexico, the United Kingdom, France and Australia. In Great Britain, Valentine’s Day began to be popularly celebrated around the 17th century. By the middle of the 18th, it was common for friends and lovers of all social classes to exchange small tokens of affection or handwritten notes, and by 1900 printed cards began to replace written letters due to improvements in printing technology. Ready-made cards were an easy way for people to express their emotions in a time when direct expression of one’s feelings was discouraged. Cheaper postage rates also contributed to an increase in the popularity of sending Valentine’s Day greetings.

Americans probably began exchanging hand-made valentines in the early 1700s. In the 1840s, Esther A. Howland began selling the first mass-produced valentines in America. Howland, known as the “Mother of the Valentine,” made elaborate creations with real lace, ribbons and colorful pictures known as “scrap.” Today, according to the Greeting Card Association, an estimated 1 billion Valentine’s Day cards are sent each year, making Valentine’s Day the second largest card-sending holiday of the year. (An estimated 2.6 billion cards are sent for Christmas.) Women purchase approximately 85 percent of all valentines. 💜

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#BUNDTBAKERS FRESH PEAR BUNDT CAKE WITH CREAMY VANILLA GLAZE

National Bundt Day comes around each year on November 15th. It was originally proclaimed by the Governor of Minnesota in honor of Nordic Ware’s 60th anniversary, making 2016 the eleventh annual Minnesota Bundt Day, while coinciding with National Bundt Day! It is the perfect time of year since most families are pulling out recipes, preheating the oven and baking more than ever!

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🐝 I’ve never been a big fan of cooked pears so this topic presented me with a real challenge.   I thought that out of all the recipes I reviewed, I might actually enjoy not only making this cake but eating it too. I must thank Lauren Everson from Sew You Think You Can Cook for this interesting theme. I think this will be a refreshing change from my usual baked treats. Thanks Lauren and though it’s a bit early, Happy Thanksgiving 🦃 to you and all the other #BundtBakers 🍁.   Also, thanks for your help, I didn’t realize I was in the wrong spot.  This recipe has been adapted from Taste of the South magazine.  Thanks for this creative and unique recipe.  I plan to enjoy the taste of Fall.

As an aside, I actually made my own cake release.  It’s simply equal parts of shortening; flour, and oil.  I used coconut oil for the health properties it contains.  BTW, it works.

#BUNDTBAKERS FRESH PEAR BUNDT CAKE WITH CREAMY VANILLA GLAZE
Print Recipe
I chose to actually make this cake on National Bundt Cake Day to ensure an especially tasty cake. So far, so good. The aroma was a welcome fragrance, reminiscent of Fall. This theme was a proven success. This was a very simple recipe but with a complex flavor. It's really very tasty {and I dislike cooked pears}. I'm pretty sure all who make it will enjoy it.
Servings Prep Time
10 ~ 12 People 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
75 Minutes 2 Hours
Servings Prep Time
10 ~ 12 People 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
75 Minutes 2 Hours
#BUNDTBAKERS FRESH PEAR BUNDT CAKE WITH CREAMY VANILLA GLAZE
Print Recipe
I chose to actually make this cake on National Bundt Cake Day to ensure an especially tasty cake. So far, so good. The aroma was a welcome fragrance, reminiscent of Fall. This theme was a proven success. This was a very simple recipe but with a complex flavor. It's really very tasty {and I dislike cooked pears}. I'm pretty sure all who make it will enjoy it.
Servings Prep Time
10 ~ 12 People 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
75 Minutes 2 Hours
Servings Prep Time
10 ~ 12 People 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
75 Minutes 2 Hours
Ingredients
FOR THE CAKE
CREAMY VANILLA GLAZE
Servings: People
Instructions
THE CAKE
  1. Preheat oven to 325º F; prepare a 15 cup Bundt pan with cake release, home made or purchased
  2. In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, cinnamon, baking soda, salt, ginger and cardamom. Whisk until well mixed.
  3. Make a well in the dry ingredenients; add eggs, continue whisking to combine.
  4. Gradually add canola oil. Fold in pear 🍐, vanilla and orange zest. Continue stirrng until well combined. Pour batter into prepared bundt cake pan and smooth with the back of a metal spoon.
  5. Bake for 1 hour and 15 minutes or until your cake tester comes out clean.
  6. Allow the cake to cool in the pan on a wire rack for 20 minutes. Invert cake onto a rack and cool completely. Drizzle with Creamy Vanilla Glaze, if desired.
CREAMY VANILLA GLAZE
  1. In a small saucepan, bring brown sugar, cream, butter, vanilla and salt. Bring to a boil over medium~high heat.
  2. Cook, whisking constantly for one minute. Remove from heat and let cool completely. Gradually whisk in confectioners sugar. Pour Glaze over cooled cake.
Recipe Notes

NATIONAL BUNDT DAY ~ NOVEMBER 15

Bundt Cake

A Bundt cake /bʌnt/ is a cake that is baked in a Bundt pan, shaping it into a distinctive ring shape. The shape is inspired by a traditional European cake known as Gugelhupf, but Bundt cakes are not generally associated with any single recipe. The style of mold in North America was popularized in the 1950s and 1960s, after cookware manufacturer Nordic Ware trademarked the name "Bundt" and began producing Bundt pans from cast aluminum. Publicity from Pillsbury saw the cakes gain widespread popularity.

Etymology:

The Bundt cake derives in part from a European brioche-like cake called Gugelhupf which was particularly popular among Jewish communities in parts of Germany, Austria and Poland. In the north of Germany Gugelhupf is traditionally known as Bundkuchen (German pronunciation: [ˈbʊntkuːxn̩]), a name formed by joining the two words Bund and Kuchen (cake).

Opinions differ as to the significance of the word Bund. One possibility is that it means "bunch" or "bundle", and refers to the way the dough is bundled around the tubed center of the pan. Another source suggests that it describes the banded appearance given to the cake by the fluted sides of the pan, similar to a tied sheaf or bundle of wheat. Some authors have

Uses of the word bund outside of Europe to describe cakes can be found in Jewish-American cookbooks from around the start of the 20th century. The alternative spelling "bundte" also appears in a recipe as early as 1901.

Design

Bundt-style pans can be made of silicone and metal. Bundt cakes do not conform to any single recipe; instead their characterizing feature is their shape. A Bundt pan generally has fluted or grooved sides, but its most defining design element is the central tube or "chimney" which leaves a cylindrical hole through the center of the cake. The design means that more of the mixture touches the surface of the pan than in a simple round pan, helping to provide faster and more even heat distribution during cooking. The shape is similar to that of the earlier European Gugelhupf or Bundkuchen. A Gugelhupf differs from contemporary Bundt-style cakes in that it follows a particular yeast-based recipe, with fruit and nuts, and is often deeper in shape and more decorative. Also similar in shape is the Eastern European Babka, dating from early 18th century Poland. While Babka is associated with Jewish culture, Bundt cake is firmly set in Christian tradition and is traditionally baked for Christmas and Easter. Today, there is no recipe for "Bundt cake". Anything can be baked in a Bundt-style pan, and is. Recipes range from Pine Nut and Chili cakes to ice cream and fruit concoctions. And, Bundt-style pan design has expanded beyond the original fluted ring to today's designs of skylines, octopus and cathedrals, all with the requisite hole in the center of the pan made by Nordic Ware and others. Since a toroidal cake is rather difficult to frost, Bundt cakes are typically either dusted with powdered sugar, drizzle-glazed, or served undecorated. Recipes specifically designed for Bundt pans often have a baked-in filling; Bundt pound cakes are also common.

Since the name "Bundt" is a trademark, similar pans are often sold as "fluted tube pans" or given other similar descriptive titles. The trademark holder Nordic Ware only produces Bundt pans in aluminum, but similar fluted pans are available in other materials.

Rise to Popularity:

The people credited with popularizing the Bundt cake are American businessman H. David Dalquist and his brother Mark S. Dalquist, who co-founded cookware company Nordic Ware based in St. Louis Park, Minnesota. In the late 1940s, Rose Joshua and Fannie Schanfield, friends and members of the Minneapolis Jewish-American Hadassah Society approached Dalquist asking if he could produce a modern version of a traditional cast iron Gugelhupf dish. Dalquist and company engineer Don Nygren designed a cast aluminum version which Nordic Ware then made a small production run of in 1950. In order to successfully trademark the pans, a "t" was added to the word "Bund". A number of the original Bundt pans now reside in the Smithsonian collection.

Initially, the Bundt pan sold so poorly that Nordic Ware considered discontinuing it. The product received a boost when it was mentioned in the New Good Housekeeping Cookbook in 1963, but did not gain real popularity until 1966, when a Bundt cake called the "Tunnel of Fudge", baked by Ella Helfrich, took second place at the annual Pillsbury Bake-Off and won its baker $5,000. The resulting publicity resulted in more than 200,000 requests to Pillsbury for Bundt pans and soon led to the Bundt pan surpassing the tin Jell-O mold as the most-sold pan in the United States. In the 1970s Pillsbury licensed the name Bundt from Nordic Ware and for a while sold a range of Bundt cake mixes.

To date, more than 60 million Bundt pans have been sold by Nordic Ware across North America. 💜 ~Wikipedia

And don’t forget to take a peek at what other talented bakers have baked this month:

BundtBakers is a group of Bundt loving bakers who get together once a month to bake Bundts with a common ingredient or theme. You can see all our of lovely Bundts by following our Pinterest board. We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient.

Updated links for all of our past events and more information about BundtBakers, can be found on our <a href="http://www.foodlustpeoplelove.com/p/bundtbakers.html">home page</a>.

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