#BUNDTBAKERS FRESH PEAR BUNDT CAKE WITH CREAMY VANILLA GLAZE

National Bundt Day comes around each year on November 15th. It was originally proclaimed by the Governor of Minnesota in honor of Nordic Ware’s 60th anniversary, making 2016 the eleventh annual Minnesota Bundt Day, while coinciding with National Bundt Day! It is the perfect time of year since most families are pulling out recipes, preheating the oven and baking more than ever!

img_0885


🐝 I’ve never been a big fan of cooked pears so this topic presented me with a real challenge.   I thought that out of all the recipes I reviewed, I might actually enjoy not only making this cake but eating it too. I must thank Lauren Everson from Sew You Think You Can Cook for this interesting theme. I think this will be a refreshing change from my usual baked treats. Thanks Lauren and though it’s a bit early, Happy Thanksgiving 🦃 to you and all the other #BundtBakers 🍁.   Also, thanks for your help, I didn’t realize I was in the wrong spot.  This recipe has been adapted from Taste of the South magazine.  Thanks for this creative and unique recipe.  I plan to enjoy the taste of Fall.

As an aside, I actually made my own cake release.  It’s simply equal parts of shortening; flour, and oil.  I used coconut oil for the health properties it contains.  BTW, it works.

#BUNDTBAKERS FRESH PEAR BUNDT CAKE WITH CREAMY VANILLA GLAZE
Print Recipe
I chose to actually make this cake on National Bundt Cake Day to ensure an especially tasty cake. So far, so good. The aroma was a welcome fragrance, reminiscent of Fall. This theme was a proven success. This was a very simple recipe but with a complex flavor. It's really very tasty {and I dislike cooked pears}. I'm pretty sure all who make it will enjoy it.
Servings Prep Time
10 ~ 12 People 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
75 Minutes 2 Hours
Servings Prep Time
10 ~ 12 People 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
75 Minutes 2 Hours
#BUNDTBAKERS FRESH PEAR BUNDT CAKE WITH CREAMY VANILLA GLAZE
Print Recipe
I chose to actually make this cake on National Bundt Cake Day to ensure an especially tasty cake. So far, so good. The aroma was a welcome fragrance, reminiscent of Fall. This theme was a proven success. This was a very simple recipe but with a complex flavor. It's really very tasty {and I dislike cooked pears}. I'm pretty sure all who make it will enjoy it.
Servings Prep Time
10 ~ 12 People 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
75 Minutes 2 Hours
Servings Prep Time
10 ~ 12 People 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
75 Minutes 2 Hours
Ingredients
FOR THE CAKE
CREAMY VANILLA GLAZE
Servings: People
Instructions
THE CAKE
  1. Preheat oven to 325º F; prepare a 15 cup Bundt pan with cake release, home made or purchased
  2. In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, cinnamon, baking soda, salt, ginger and cardamom. Whisk until well mixed.
  3. Make a well in the dry ingredenients; add eggs, continue whisking to combine.
  4. Gradually add canola oil. Fold in pear 🍐, vanilla and orange zest. Continue stirrng until well combined. Pour batter into prepared bundt cake pan and smooth with the back of a metal spoon.
  5. Bake for 1 hour and 15 minutes or until your cake tester comes out clean.
  6. Allow the cake to cool in the pan on a wire rack for 20 minutes. Invert cake onto a rack and cool completely. Drizzle with Creamy Vanilla Glaze, if desired.
CREAMY VANILLA GLAZE
  1. In a small saucepan, bring brown sugar, cream, butter, vanilla and salt. Bring to a boil over medium~high heat.
  2. Cook, whisking constantly for one minute. Remove from heat and let cool completely. Gradually whisk in confectioners sugar. Pour Glaze over cooled cake.
Recipe Notes

NATIONAL BUNDT DAY ~ NOVEMBER 15

Bundt Cake

A Bundt cake /bʌnt/ is a cake that is baked in a Bundt pan, shaping it into a distinctive ring shape. The shape is inspired by a traditional European cake known as Gugelhupf, but Bundt cakes are not generally associated with any single recipe. The style of mold in North America was popularized in the 1950s and 1960s, after cookware manufacturer Nordic Ware trademarked the name "Bundt" and began producing Bundt pans from cast aluminum. Publicity from Pillsbury saw the cakes gain widespread popularity.

Etymology:

The Bundt cake derives in part from a European brioche-like cake called Gugelhupf which was particularly popular among Jewish communities in parts of Germany, Austria and Poland. In the north of Germany Gugelhupf is traditionally known as Bundkuchen (German pronunciation: [ˈbʊntkuːxn̩]), a name formed by joining the two words Bund and Kuchen (cake).

Opinions differ as to the significance of the word Bund. One possibility is that it means "bunch" or "bundle", and refers to the way the dough is bundled around the tubed center of the pan. Another source suggests that it describes the banded appearance given to the cake by the fluted sides of the pan, similar to a tied sheaf or bundle of wheat. Some authors have

Uses of the word bund outside of Europe to describe cakes can be found in Jewish-American cookbooks from around the start of the 20th century. The alternative spelling "bundte" also appears in a recipe as early as 1901.

Design

Bundt-style pans can be made of silicone and metal. Bundt cakes do not conform to any single recipe; instead their characterizing feature is their shape. A Bundt pan generally has fluted or grooved sides, but its most defining design element is the central tube or "chimney" which leaves a cylindrical hole through the center of the cake. The design means that more of the mixture touches the surface of the pan than in a simple round pan, helping to provide faster and more even heat distribution during cooking. The shape is similar to that of the earlier European Gugelhupf or Bundkuchen. A Gugelhupf differs from contemporary Bundt-style cakes in that it follows a particular yeast-based recipe, with fruit and nuts, and is often deeper in shape and more decorative. Also similar in shape is the Eastern European Babka, dating from early 18th century Poland. While Babka is associated with Jewish culture, Bundt cake is firmly set in Christian tradition and is traditionally baked for Christmas and Easter. Today, there is no recipe for "Bundt cake". Anything can be baked in a Bundt-style pan, and is. Recipes range from Pine Nut and Chili cakes to ice cream and fruit concoctions. And, Bundt-style pan design has expanded beyond the original fluted ring to today's designs of skylines, octopus and cathedrals, all with the requisite hole in the center of the pan made by Nordic Ware and others. Since a toroidal cake is rather difficult to frost, Bundt cakes are typically either dusted with powdered sugar, drizzle-glazed, or served undecorated. Recipes specifically designed for Bundt pans often have a baked-in filling; Bundt pound cakes are also common.

Since the name "Bundt" is a trademark, similar pans are often sold as "fluted tube pans" or given other similar descriptive titles. The trademark holder Nordic Ware only produces Bundt pans in aluminum, but similar fluted pans are available in other materials.

Rise to Popularity:

The people credited with popularizing the Bundt cake are American businessman H. David Dalquist and his brother Mark S. Dalquist, who co-founded cookware company Nordic Ware based in St. Louis Park, Minnesota. In the late 1940s, Rose Joshua and Fannie Schanfield, friends and members of the Minneapolis Jewish-American Hadassah Society approached Dalquist asking if he could produce a modern version of a traditional cast iron Gugelhupf dish. Dalquist and company engineer Don Nygren designed a cast aluminum version which Nordic Ware then made a small production run of in 1950. In order to successfully trademark the pans, a "t" was added to the word "Bund". A number of the original Bundt pans now reside in the Smithsonian collection.

Initially, the Bundt pan sold so poorly that Nordic Ware considered discontinuing it. The product received a boost when it was mentioned in the New Good Housekeeping Cookbook in 1963, but did not gain real popularity until 1966, when a Bundt cake called the "Tunnel of Fudge", baked by Ella Helfrich, took second place at the annual Pillsbury Bake-Off and won its baker $5,000. The resulting publicity resulted in more than 200,000 requests to Pillsbury for Bundt pans and soon led to the Bundt pan surpassing the tin Jell-O mold as the most-sold pan in the United States. In the 1970s Pillsbury licensed the name Bundt from Nordic Ware and for a while sold a range of Bundt cake mixes.

To date, more than 60 million Bundt pans have been sold by Nordic Ware across North America. 💜 ~Wikipedia

And don’t forget to take a peek at what other talented bakers have baked this month:

BundtBakers is a group of Bundt loving bakers who get together once a month to bake Bundts with a common ingredient or theme. You can see all our of lovely Bundts by following our Pinterest board. We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient.

Updated links for all of our past events and more information about BundtBakers, can be found on our <a href="http://www.foodlustpeoplelove.com/p/bundtbakers.html">home page</a>.

Share this Recipe

#BUNDTBAKERS TUNNEL OF FUDGE BUNDT CAKE

This cake is “old” enough to be considered a vintage recipe and is almost solely responsible for the rise of popularity and sales of Bundt pans.

image

Today’s recipe, is from The Cook’s Country Cookbook, and is for an updated version of the classic Tunnel of Fudge Cake. The bakers at America’s Test Kitchen made two dozen cakes before arriving at this rendition, and swaps half of the granulated sugar for brown sugar.  This cake was very popular in the 60’s and fondly remembered by the baby~boomers.  Later, as I recall, there were “cake mixes” available in the local supermarkets.

I have substituted Splenda white and Splenda brown sugar to make it a healthier version.  I’ve been baking and cooking with both Splenda sugars for quite awhile.  I’ve always had success in texture and taste.  It’s an even swap, 1 to 1.

When testing this cake for doneness, do not use the inserted toothpick method as the tunnel of fudge will always look underdone.   Instead, look to see if the sides are beginning to pull away from the pan. When pressed, the top of the cake should feel springy.

This month, our theme is a Healthy cheat, sneak or substitute hosted by Andrea Potter Kruse.  It didn’t take me too long to decide which recipe to use.  My brother~in~law has been asking for this cake even before #BundtBakers became a part of my interests.  So, thank you Andrea for this ingenious theme which also required a bit of thought and research.  But my brother~in~law thanks you in a BIG way {plus, it’s his birthday this month}.

THE ORIGINAL RECIPE:

Tunnel of Fudge Cake
1 1/2 cups soft Land O’ Lakes Butter
6 eggs
1 1/2 cups sugar
2 cups Pillsbury’s Best Flour (Regular, Instant Blending or Self Rising*)
1 package Pillsbury Double Dutch Fudge Buttercream Frosting Mix
2 cups chopped Diamond Walnuts

Oven 350° [ed. 350 F / 175 C]
10-inch tube cake

Cream butter in large mixer bowl at high speed of mixer. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each. Gradually add sugar, continue creaming at high speed until light and fluffy. By hand, stir in flour, frosting mix, and walnuts until well blended. Pour batter into greased Bundt pan or 10-inch Angel Food tube pan. Bake at 350° for 60 to 65 minutes. Cool 2 hours, remove from pan. Cool completely before serving.

Note: Walnuts, Double Dutch Fudge Frosting Mix and butter are key to the success of this unusual recipe. Since cake has a soft fudgy interior, test for doneness after 60 minutes by observing dry, shiny brownie-type crust.

It originally required Pillsbury “Double Dutch Fudge Frosting Mix”, which was later discontinued by Pillsbury.   In response to widespread complaints, Pillsbury released a revised version that introduced cocoa powder in place of the frosting mix.

REVISED  RECIPE FOR TUNNEL OF FUDGE BUNDT CAKE FROM PILLSBURY

This revised recipe makes up for the now-extinct ingredient of “Double Dutch Fudge Frosting Mix.” Note that Pillsbury introduced a glaze, whereas the original did not have one. Pillsbury notes that the cake will not work without the called-for amount of nuts.

For the cake:
1 3/4 cups white sugar
1 3/4 cups margarine or softened butter
6 eggs
2 cups icing sugar
2 1/4 cups Pillsbury BEST® All Purpose or Unbleached Flour
3/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
2 cups chopped walnuts

For the glaze:
3/4 cup icing sugar
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
4 to 6 teaspoons milk

Start heating oven to 350 F / 175 C.

Grease and flour a 12-cup (3 litres) fluted tube cake pan or a 10-inch (25 cm) tube pan. Set aside.

In a large bowl, beat the butter and sugar until fluffy. Add eggs one at a time and beat after each one. Add the 2 cups of icing sugar a little at a time, beating after each addition. Stir in flour (if you have been using an electric beater, switch to hand for this) and all remaining ingredients in the cake section. Pour or spoon batter into the prepared cake pan and smooth it out. Pop into oven and bake until edges start to pull away from the pan and the top is set. Don’t go by standard tests such as a dry toothpick test; they won’t work with this cake. The cake should be done in 45 to 50 minutes. Remove cake from oven, leave in pan, and set on wire rack to cool 1 1/2 hours, then invert onto a plate and let cool a further 2 hours.

Now, mix all the glaze ingredients. You want the glaze to be runny enough to drizzle, so add a bit more milk if you have to. Drizzle over top, and let some run down the sides of the cake.

#BUNDTBAKERS TUNNEL OF FUDGE BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
My dear brother~in~law has been asking for this cake ever since he heard about my joining the #BundtBakers group. What makes this a perfect opportunity is that I substituted Splenda for both brown and white sugars. He is diabetic and so swapping out the sugars is perfect timing. I know he will love it and I'm sure I will too.
Servings Prep Time
1 Bundt cake 30 ~ 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 Minutes {approximately} 2 1/2 Hours
Servings Prep Time
1 Bundt cake 30 ~ 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 Minutes {approximately} 2 1/2 Hours
#BUNDTBAKERS TUNNEL OF FUDGE BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
My dear brother~in~law has been asking for this cake ever since he heard about my joining the #BundtBakers group. What makes this a perfect opportunity is that I substituted Splenda for both brown and white sugars. He is diabetic and so swapping out the sugars is perfect timing. I know he will love it and I'm sure I will too.
Servings Prep Time
1 Bundt cake 30 ~ 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 Minutes {approximately} 2 1/2 Hours
Servings Prep Time
1 Bundt cake 30 ~ 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 Minutes {approximately} 2 1/2 Hours
Ingredients
For the Cake
For the Glaze
Servings: Bundt cake
Instructions
  1. For the cake: preheat oven to 350º F And prepare a 12 cup, non~stick Bundt pan by brushing the interior with 1 T butter plus 1 T cocoa powder. Or use your own homemade cake release, then dust with cocoa powder.
  2. Whisk the boiling water and chocolate together in a small bowl until melted and smooth; let the mixture cool slightly.
  3. In a medium bowl, whisk the flour, nuts, confectioners sugar, cocoa and salt together.
  4. In a large bowl {Kitchen Aid if you're lucky enough to have one.} beat the butter, sugars and vanilla together on medium speed until light and fluffy, about 6 minutes.
  5. Beat in eggs, one at a time until combined, beat in the chocolate mixture and blend on low for about 30 seconds. Slowly beat in the flour mixture until just incorporated, about 30 seconds.
  6. Scrape the batter into prepared pan and smooth the top. Wipe any drops of batter off the sides of the pan and gently tap the pan on your work surface to settle the batter.
  7. Bake the cake until the edges start pulling away from the sides of the pan and the top feels springy with pressed finger, about 45 minutes. The toothpick method will not work with this cake as the tunnel of fudge will not appear done at any point.
  8. For the glaze: In the meantime, whisk all the ingredients for the glaze together in a medium bowl until smooth and thickened.
  9. Allow the cake to cool in the pan, on top of a cooling rack for 10 minutes, then flip it out on a wire rack. Let the cake cool completely, about 2 hours. Drizzle the chocolate glaze over the top and sides of the cake. Allow the glaze to set up ~ about 25 minutes, before serving.
  10. Once completely cooled, mix all the glaze ingredients together until the desired consistency. Drizzle the glaze over the cake while it is still on the wire rack, putting a sheet pan beneath to catch the drips. Move to serving plate and add chopped, toasted walnuts to the finished cake.
Recipe Notes

The Bundt pan was invented in the 1950s by a man named H. David Dalquist. The pan was based on a traditional ceramic dish with a similar ringed shape. Though Dalquist's version was lighter and easier to use than the clunky previous version, sales were disappointing.

Then, in 1966, a woman named Ella Helfrich took second place {and won $25,000 dollars} in the annual Pillsbury Bake-Off with her recipe for Tunnel of Fudge Cake. The walnut-filled, chocolate-glazed cake had a ring of gooey fudge at its center. Eating a slice was reminiscent of indulging in under-baked brownie batter. Helfrich's cake was an overnight sensation. Pillsbury received more than 200,000 requests for the pan she used, and Dalquist's company went into overtime production. Today, more than 50 million Bundt pans of all shapes and sizes have been sold around the world.

Though her recipe only won second prize, it was enough to clinch her place in American cooking fame. The first prize recipe from that year has been forgotten. Ella's, though, was an immediate sensation.

Pillsbury ran newspaper ads across America showing a photo of a slice of the cake with the large, bold caption "Makes its own tunnel of fudge as it bakes". The ad (accompanied by an 8 cent clip-out coupon) said:

"Sensational Tunnel of Fudge Cake is a  Rich, yummy chocolate cake that makes its own thick, fudgey center as it bakes. What an idea! And Tunnel of Fudge Cake is easy. Shortcutted, streamlined, up-to-dated (sic) by Pillsbury's Best. Makes baking from scratch easy as baking from a mix! Just one bowl. Six ingredients. Ten minutes' preparation time. Because Pillsbury Double Dutch Fudge Frosting Mix goes right in the batter—makes the flavor, the tunnel as the cake bakes! You'll bake Tunnel of Fudge Cake again and again. The recipe's at your grocer's. Pick it up at the same time you get your Pillsbury's Best —Plain or Self-Rising."

Mrs. Helfrich continued to enter the Bake-Offs after 1966, but never won again. She felt it was owing to her resisting the pressure to go "light and lively" in her recipes. She told reporters there were four major food groups for her: butter, chocolate, pecans and sugar. "You can't go low-cal when you're using pecans and brown sugar," she said in 1999, I like her style.  She especially liked cooking with pecans, as she had a pecan tree in her backyard.

You may notice that this cake has many similar versions:  the original from Mrs Helfrich; The new recipe from Pillsbury once they stopped making the fudge frosting included in the original; and the one from Cooks Corner which I have adjusted and chosen to share with you all today.  Similar yet distinctive, this version just works for me. 💜

 

Insert list

BundtBakers

#BundtBakers is a group of Bundt loving bakers who get together once a month to bake Bundts with a common ingredient or theme. Follow our Pinterest board right here. Links are also updated each month on the BundtBakers home page.

Share this Recipe