#ISW SCONE WEEK 2017 CLASSIC SNICKERS SCONES

Once again I found time to work with my favorite media, scones! For me, baking can be a very creative outlet . Above all other recipes, scones are my most adored. They come together easily and the final result is always delicious; scone recipes are quite varied from savory to cream scones to sweet scones. I especially love how scone recipes can be slightly altered, yet produce something all together unique.

This recipe is for a very dear friend’s {EXTREMELY BELATED} Birthday gift.  It is a special request scone and I know she and her Mom will really enjoy them.  I’m no longer able to jump in the car and go to Michael’s to pick up a nice presentation box and lace doily to help your scones look  more festive.   These scones barely made it out of the oven before Mr. B was asking for a sample.  While I made them specifically for my friend, I’m sure she won’t miss one or two.  I had to fight him off long enough so I could make the milk chocolate ganache.   The milk chocolate added another flavor layer to these already delicious scones.

#ISW 2017 CLASSIC SNICKERS SCONES
Print Recipe
These are light, tender and fabulous. They looked quite lovely in the presentation box. They came together quickly and although grating frozen butter was a bit of a nuisance, it made a world of difference. I think I'll continue using this technique for all my future scones. I'm going to try to use my food processor to grate the butter. A bit more to clean up after but it would certainly streamline preparing the scones for the oven. The glaze is so tasty I was tempted to eat it right out of the bowl. I highly recommend giving these a try, they are well worth the small effort they require.
Servings Prep Time
20 Mini Scones 20 Minutes {approximately}
Cook Time Passive Time
20 Minutes 40 really long Minutes
Servings Prep Time
20 Mini Scones 20 Minutes {approximately}
Cook Time Passive Time
20 Minutes 40 really long Minutes
#ISW 2017 CLASSIC SNICKERS SCONES
Print Recipe
These are light, tender and fabulous. They looked quite lovely in the presentation box. They came together quickly and although grating frozen butter was a bit of a nuisance, it made a world of difference. I think I'll continue using this technique for all my future scones. I'm going to try to use my food processor to grate the butter. A bit more to clean up after but it would certainly streamline preparing the scones for the oven. The glaze is so tasty I was tempted to eat it right out of the bowl. I highly recommend giving these a try, they are well worth the small effort they require.
Servings Prep Time
20 Mini Scones 20 Minutes {approximately}
Cook Time Passive Time
20 Minutes 40 really long Minutes
Servings Prep Time
20 Mini Scones 20 Minutes {approximately}
Cook Time Passive Time
20 Minutes 40 really long Minutes
Ingredients
Classic Snickers Scones
Milk Chocolate Glaze
  • 4 Ounces Milk chocolate Chopped
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Shortening I used solid coconut oil.
  • snickers Finely chopped for decoration and just an excuse to add more candy bar
Servings: Mini Scones
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 450º F and line a cookie sheet with parchment or use a silpat mat
  2. Stir together the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt.
  3. Grate the frozen butter on the large holes of a box grater. I tried this method last year, and it worked like a dream. Mix the flour and frozen butter with your fingers until well combined and crumbly.
  4. Whisk together the egg, buttermilk and Vanilla Bean Paste. Pour into the flour/butter mixture and stir until, until combined. The dough should look very shaggy.. Fold in the frozen, chopped Snickers.
  5. Place tablespoons of the shaggy dough into a prepared scone pan. Mine is a mini scone pan I'm particularly fond of.
  6. If any Snickers are poking out of the dough, poke them back in to avoid the caramel oozing and burning while baking.
  7. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, until golden. After 10 minutes, switch the scone pan around so the front becomes the back. Remove from baking sheet or pan and allow to cool on a wire cooling rack.
  8. While the scones are cooling, make the glaze. Melt the chopped milk chocolate and coconut oil (solid) in the microwave on 50% power for 30 second intervals. Stir after each interval, until melted. Drizzle lavishly delicious glaze over baked scones. Sprinkle finely chopped, frozen, Snickers over the milk chocolate glaze. [sheer perfection}. Even though they are a gift, I'm going to snatch a couple for my evening tea. Can't wait.
Recipe Notes

I have  always been a fan of Snickers candy bars but when they started producing  them with different nuts, I just about lost it.  My personal choice is still Almond Snickers but I'm crazy about this candy bar in any flavor.  There is no better way to enjoy them when baked into a light, flakey scone..  They are after all "a bit of Heaven in your hand" (to quote a very bright gal, me).  This recipe gave me 20 mini scones plus an additional four on a baking sheet.  They are so rich and delectable that a mini scone is just right to satisfy, but, two are just that much tastier.🐝💜

A scone is a single-serving quick bread/cake, usually made of wheat, barley or oatmeal with baking powder as a leavening agent and baked on sheet pans. A scone is often lightly sweetened and occasionally glazed with egg wash.  The scone is a basic component of the cream tea or Devonshire tea. It differs from teacakes and other sweet buns that are made with yeast.

The pronunciation of the word within the English-speaking world varies. According to one academic study, two-thirds of the British population pronounce it /ˈskɒn/ (rhymes with gone) with the preference rising to 99% in the Scottish population.  This is also the pronunciation in Ulster, as well as among Australians and Canadians. Others, including natives of the Republic of Ireland and the United States, pronounce the word as /ˈskoʊn/ (rhymes with tone).  British dictionaries usually show the /ˈskɒn/ form as the preferred pronunciation, while recognising the /ˈskoʊn/ form.

The Oxford Dictionaries explain that there are also regional and class differences in England connected with the different pronunciations:

There are two possible pronunciations of the word scone: the first rhymes with gone and the second rhymes with tone. In US English, the pronunciation rhyming with tone is more common. In British English, the two pronunciations traditionally have different regional and class associations, with the first pronunciation associated with the north of England, while the second is associated with the south.

The difference in pronunciation is alluded to in a poem:

I asked the maid in dulcet tone
To order me a buttered scone;
The silly girl has been and gone
And ordered me a buttered scone.

The Oxford English Dictionary reports that the first mention of the word was in 1513. Origin of the word scone is obscure and may, in fact, derive from different sources. That is, the classic Scottish scone which, according to Sheila MacNiven Cameron in The Highlander's Cookbook, originated as a bannock cut into pieces; and the Dutch schoonbrood or "spoonbread" (very similar to the drop scone); and possibly other, similar and similarly named quick breads, may have made their way onto the British tea table, where their similar names merged into one.

Thus, scone may derive from the Middle Dutch schoonbrood (fine white bread), from schoon (pure, clean) and brood (bread),  and/or it may also derive from the Scots Gaelic term sgonn meaning a shapeless mass or large mouthful. The Middle Low German term schöne meaning fine bread may also have played a role in the origination of this word. And if the explanation put forward by Sheila MacNiven Cameron be true, the word may also be based on the town of Scone (/ˈskuːn/) (Scots: Scuin, Scottish Gaelic: Sgàin) in Scotland, the ancient capital of that country – where Scottish monarchs were still crowned, even after the capital was moved to Perth, then to Edinburgh (and on whose Scone Stone the monarchs of the United Kingdom are still crowned today).  I found information on line and looked into, applied and was accepted as a Scone.  So, I am a Scone.

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#BUNDTBAKERS TUNNEL OF FUDGE BUNDT CAKE

This cake is “old” enough to be considered a vintage recipe and is almost solely responsible for the rise of popularity and sales of Bundt pans.

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Today’s recipe, is from The Cook’s Country Cookbook, and is for an updated version of the classic Tunnel of Fudge Cake. The bakers at America’s Test Kitchen made two dozen cakes before arriving at this rendition, and swaps half of the granulated sugar for brown sugar.  This cake was very popular in the 60’s and fondly remembered by the baby~boomers.  Later, as I recall, there were “cake mixes” available in the local supermarkets.

I have substituted Splenda white and Splenda brown sugar to make it a healthier version.  I’ve been baking and cooking with both Splenda sugars for quite awhile.  I’ve always had success in texture and taste.  It’s an even swap, 1 to 1.

When testing this cake for doneness, do not use the inserted toothpick method as the tunnel of fudge will always look underdone.   Instead, look to see if the sides are beginning to pull away from the pan. When pressed, the top of the cake should feel springy.

This month, our theme is a Healthy cheat, sneak or substitute hosted by Andrea Potter Kruse.  It didn’t take me too long to decide which recipe to use.  My brother~in~law has been asking for this cake even before #BundtBakers became a part of my interests.  So, thank you Andrea for this ingenious theme which also required a bit of thought and research.  But my brother~in~law thanks you in a BIG way {plus, it’s his birthday this month}.

THE ORIGINAL RECIPE:

Tunnel of Fudge Cake
1 1/2 cups soft Land O’ Lakes Butter
6 eggs
1 1/2 cups sugar
2 cups Pillsbury’s Best Flour (Regular, Instant Blending or Self Rising*)
1 package Pillsbury Double Dutch Fudge Buttercream Frosting Mix
2 cups chopped Diamond Walnuts

Oven 350° [ed. 350 F / 175 C]
10-inch tube cake

Cream butter in large mixer bowl at high speed of mixer. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each. Gradually add sugar, continue creaming at high speed until light and fluffy. By hand, stir in flour, frosting mix, and walnuts until well blended. Pour batter into greased Bundt pan or 10-inch Angel Food tube pan. Bake at 350° for 60 to 65 minutes. Cool 2 hours, remove from pan. Cool completely before serving.

Note: Walnuts, Double Dutch Fudge Frosting Mix and butter are key to the success of this unusual recipe. Since cake has a soft fudgy interior, test for doneness after 60 minutes by observing dry, shiny brownie-type crust.

It originally required Pillsbury “Double Dutch Fudge Frosting Mix”, which was later discontinued by Pillsbury.   In response to widespread complaints, Pillsbury released a revised version that introduced cocoa powder in place of the frosting mix.

REVISED  RECIPE FOR TUNNEL OF FUDGE BUNDT CAKE FROM PILLSBURY

This revised recipe makes up for the now-extinct ingredient of “Double Dutch Fudge Frosting Mix.” Note that Pillsbury introduced a glaze, whereas the original did not have one. Pillsbury notes that the cake will not work without the called-for amount of nuts.

For the cake:
1 3/4 cups white sugar
1 3/4 cups margarine or softened butter
6 eggs
2 cups icing sugar
2 1/4 cups Pillsbury BEST® All Purpose or Unbleached Flour
3/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
2 cups chopped walnuts

For the glaze:
3/4 cup icing sugar
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
4 to 6 teaspoons milk

Start heating oven to 350 F / 175 C.

Grease and flour a 12-cup (3 litres) fluted tube cake pan or a 10-inch (25 cm) tube pan. Set aside.

In a large bowl, beat the butter and sugar until fluffy. Add eggs one at a time and beat after each one. Add the 2 cups of icing sugar a little at a time, beating after each addition. Stir in flour (if you have been using an electric beater, switch to hand for this) and all remaining ingredients in the cake section. Pour or spoon batter into the prepared cake pan and smooth it out. Pop into oven and bake until edges start to pull away from the pan and the top is set. Don’t go by standard tests such as a dry toothpick test; they won’t work with this cake. The cake should be done in 45 to 50 minutes. Remove cake from oven, leave in pan, and set on wire rack to cool 1 1/2 hours, then invert onto a plate and let cool a further 2 hours.

Now, mix all the glaze ingredients. You want the glaze to be runny enough to drizzle, so add a bit more milk if you have to. Drizzle over top, and let some run down the sides of the cake.

#BUNDTBAKERS TUNNEL OF FUDGE BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
My dear brother~in~law has been asking for this cake ever since he heard about my joining the #BundtBakers group. What makes this a perfect opportunity is that I substituted Splenda for both brown and white sugars. He is diabetic and so swapping out the sugars is perfect timing. I know he will love it and I'm sure I will too.
Servings Prep Time
1 Bundt cake 30 ~ 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 Minutes {approximately} 2 1/2 Hours
Servings Prep Time
1 Bundt cake 30 ~ 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 Minutes {approximately} 2 1/2 Hours
#BUNDTBAKERS TUNNEL OF FUDGE BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
My dear brother~in~law has been asking for this cake ever since he heard about my joining the #BundtBakers group. What makes this a perfect opportunity is that I substituted Splenda for both brown and white sugars. He is diabetic and so swapping out the sugars is perfect timing. I know he will love it and I'm sure I will too.
Servings Prep Time
1 Bundt cake 30 ~ 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 Minutes {approximately} 2 1/2 Hours
Servings Prep Time
1 Bundt cake 30 ~ 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 Minutes {approximately} 2 1/2 Hours
Ingredients
For the Cake
For the Glaze
Servings: Bundt cake
Instructions
  1. For the cake: preheat oven to 350º F And prepare a 12 cup, non~stick Bundt pan by brushing the interior with 1 T butter plus 1 T cocoa powder. Or use your own homemade cake release, then dust with cocoa powder.
  2. Whisk the boiling water and chocolate together in a small bowl until melted and smooth; let the mixture cool slightly.
  3. In a medium bowl, whisk the flour, nuts, confectioners sugar, cocoa and salt together.
  4. In a large bowl {Kitchen Aid if you're lucky enough to have one.} beat the butter, sugars and vanilla together on medium speed until light and fluffy, about 6 minutes.
  5. Beat in eggs, one at a time until combined, beat in the chocolate mixture and blend on low for about 30 seconds. Slowly beat in the flour mixture until just incorporated, about 30 seconds.
  6. Scrape the batter into prepared pan and smooth the top. Wipe any drops of batter off the sides of the pan and gently tap the pan on your work surface to settle the batter.
  7. Bake the cake until the edges start pulling away from the sides of the pan and the top feels springy with pressed finger, about 45 minutes. The toothpick method will not work with this cake as the tunnel of fudge will not appear done at any point.
  8. For the glaze: In the meantime, whisk all the ingredients for the glaze together in a medium bowl until smooth and thickened.
  9. Allow the cake to cool in the pan, on top of a cooling rack for 10 minutes, then flip it out on a wire rack. Let the cake cool completely, about 2 hours. Drizzle the chocolate glaze over the top and sides of the cake. Allow the glaze to set up ~ about 25 minutes, before serving.
  10. Once completely cooled, mix all the glaze ingredients together until the desired consistency. Drizzle the glaze over the cake while it is still on the wire rack, putting a sheet pan beneath to catch the drips. Move to serving plate and add chopped, toasted walnuts to the finished cake.
Recipe Notes

The Bundt pan was invented in the 1950s by a man named H. David Dalquist. The pan was based on a traditional ceramic dish with a similar ringed shape. Though Dalquist's version was lighter and easier to use than the clunky previous version, sales were disappointing.

Then, in 1966, a woman named Ella Helfrich took second place {and won $25,000 dollars} in the annual Pillsbury Bake-Off with her recipe for Tunnel of Fudge Cake. The walnut-filled, chocolate-glazed cake had a ring of gooey fudge at its center. Eating a slice was reminiscent of indulging in under-baked brownie batter. Helfrich's cake was an overnight sensation. Pillsbury received more than 200,000 requests for the pan she used, and Dalquist's company went into overtime production. Today, more than 50 million Bundt pans of all shapes and sizes have been sold around the world.

Though her recipe only won second prize, it was enough to clinch her place in American cooking fame. The first prize recipe from that year has been forgotten. Ella's, though, was an immediate sensation.

Pillsbury ran newspaper ads across America showing a photo of a slice of the cake with the large, bold caption "Makes its own tunnel of fudge as it bakes". The ad (accompanied by an 8 cent clip-out coupon) said:

"Sensational Tunnel of Fudge Cake is a  Rich, yummy chocolate cake that makes its own thick, fudgey center as it bakes. What an idea! And Tunnel of Fudge Cake is easy. Shortcutted, streamlined, up-to-dated (sic) by Pillsbury's Best. Makes baking from scratch easy as baking from a mix! Just one bowl. Six ingredients. Ten minutes' preparation time. Because Pillsbury Double Dutch Fudge Frosting Mix goes right in the batter—makes the flavor, the tunnel as the cake bakes! You'll bake Tunnel of Fudge Cake again and again. The recipe's at your grocer's. Pick it up at the same time you get your Pillsbury's Best —Plain or Self-Rising."

Mrs. Helfrich continued to enter the Bake-Offs after 1966, but never won again. She felt it was owing to her resisting the pressure to go "light and lively" in her recipes. She told reporters there were four major food groups for her: butter, chocolate, pecans and sugar. "You can't go low-cal when you're using pecans and brown sugar," she said in 1999, I like her style.  She especially liked cooking with pecans, as she had a pecan tree in her backyard.

You may notice that this cake has many similar versions:  the original from Mrs Helfrich; The new recipe from Pillsbury once they stopped making the fudge frosting included in the original; and the one from Cooks Corner which I have adjusted and chosen to share with you all today.  Similar yet distinctive, this version just works for me. 💜

 

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BundtBakers

#BundtBakers is a group of Bundt loving bakers who get together once a month to bake Bundts with a common ingredient or theme. Follow our Pinterest board right here. Links are also updated each month on the BundtBakers home page.

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# BUNDT BAKERS CHOCOLATE PEANUT BUTTER BUNDT CAKE WITH ESPRESSO~PEANUT BUTTER GLAZE

The theme this month is Retro Desserts Recreated as a Bundt. While I was writing this recipe, I began thinking how subjective the term “comfort food” is. This one is going to become one of my all~time favorites based on childhood memories alone. But tasting that long~forgotten mingle of flavors was very special for me.

BundtBakers is a group of Bundt loving bakers who get together once a month to bake Bundts with a common ingredient or theme. You can see all our of lovely Bundts by following our Pinterest board. http://www.pinterest.com/flpl/bundtbakers/

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When I was a young girl, my mother was simply not a baker.  My dear Aunt Jeanne was the baker.  She was well~known in Jamestown, New York for her cookies in particular.   At Christmas, she would always send a coffee can full of her delicate and delightful array.  We waited anxiously for that coffee can to arrive, then we devoured them.

As we got older, us kids would make the baked goods, cookies with the recipe from the back of the morsels bag, or boxed cakes for birthdays and holidays.

But every now and then, strictly from memory, my Mom would make a chocolate cake from scratch .  I think she always put some strong black coffee in the mix and then she would make a peanut butter/coffee icing.  Those cakes were “the best”.  After you had a piece, you were full for hours.  The cakes were always heavy but tasty.  I don’t think she knew what a sifter was for.

So when I saw this recipe, I immediately thought of her and those rare baking moments we shared, with great joy.  With a smidgen of tweaks and twists, I was off and running to smell those Heavenly aromas coming from my own kitchen.

#BUNDT BAKERS CHOCOLATE PEANUT BUTTER BUNDT CAKE WITH ESPRESSO~PEANUT BUTTER GLAZE
Print Recipe
Chocolate, peanut butter marbeled bundt cake with an espresso~peanut butter glaze. And a few filled cupcakes too.
Servings Prep Time
1+ Bundt 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
60 Minutes 2 ~ 3 Hours to cool completely
Servings Prep Time
1+ Bundt 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
60 Minutes 2 ~ 3 Hours to cool completely
#BUNDT BAKERS CHOCOLATE PEANUT BUTTER BUNDT CAKE WITH ESPRESSO~PEANUT BUTTER GLAZE
Print Recipe
Chocolate, peanut butter marbeled bundt cake with an espresso~peanut butter glaze. And a few filled cupcakes too.
Servings Prep Time
1+ Bundt 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
60 Minutes 2 ~ 3 Hours to cool completely
Servings Prep Time
1+ Bundt 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
60 Minutes 2 ~ 3 Hours to cool completely
Ingredients
THE CAKE
ESPRESSO~PEANUT BUTTER GLAZE
Servings: Bundt
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350º and grease and flour your baking pans and set them aside.
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt
  3. In a stand mixer {or large bowl and hand mixer} beat softened butter on a medium speed for about 1 minute. Slowly add the sugar and beat until combined. [4 ~ 5 minutes}. Next, slowly add the eggs, one at a time.
  4. Once the wet ingredients are completely incorporated, add the flour mixture and milk alternately until just combined.
  5. Transfer half of the batter, about 3 1/2 cups to a medium bowl, then stir in the cooled, melted chocolate until well combined. I decided to leave the peanut butter half in my stand mixer and used my hand mixer for the chocolate half.
  6. Before measuring the peanut butter, spray the measuring cup with non~stick spray for easy release. I almost forgot the cooking spray but luckily, remembered at the last minute. Add the peanut butter into the remaining cake mixture and blend until smooth, creamy and well~mixed.
  7. Using a separate spoon for each flavored batter, alternately drop spoonsful of the chocolate and the peanut butter batters into the prepared pan{s}. Use a knife or spatula to carefully swirl the batter together for that marbelized look. Do not over mix. Fill your pan until it is 3/4 full. It will increase in volume a bit while baking. Use any remaining batter for some lovely cupcakes. I think the cupcakes need a very lightly sweetened whipped~cream filling, just to take them over the top.
  8. Bake for about 60 minutes or until a cake tester or toothpick comes out clean. The cupcakes will likely be done sooner than the cake so watch your time closely. Cool the cake{s} in their respective pans for about 15 minutes. Then, remove from the pans to continue cooling on a rack. In the meantime, make your espresso~peanut butter glaze. Make a mixture of the half & half and espresso powder and stir until the espresso has dissolved.
  9. In the bowl of your mixer, combine the powdered sugar, peanut butter and enough of the heavy cream and espresso mixture to create a thick drizzle. I had to add some additional half&half to make it easier to drizzle.
  10. When your bundt cake and bonus cupcakes have cooled completely, fill the cupcakes and then drizzle both the bundt cake and cupcakes with the espresso~peanut butter glaze and enjoy. 💜
  11. Here's what I did with the leftover cake batter. I decided to make a single layer cake. I used up all of the chocolate mixture in the bundt cake so my single layer is just peanut butter and is really good.
Recipe Notes

After taking a week off, my second~degree burns have healed nicely without too much scarring.  Even so, Mr. B took over melting the chocolate for the marbeling.  I did need his help at the end because the two bowls were too heavy to lift.  I chose to use all of the chocolate mixture in the bundt cake so all of the leftover batter made a lovely, single layer peanut butter cake and let me say here both batters were exceptionally tasty.  I'm anxious to taste the end product.  Sorry there are so few pictures, I get so focused on the instructions, I forget to take pictures.  I'll get better.

This bit of yummyness is adapted from "Inspired by Charm".  Thank you Michael for this stroll down memory lane.

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SOUTHERN PECAN PRALINE SCONES

This recipe makes 10 ~ 12 large or 2 dozen petite scones that will tantalize your tastebuds. In my opinion, there isn’t much out there to equal the delight of a well~made scone. No doubt, these fit the bill to a “T”. Light, flakey, sweet, all I aim for in my scone and it’s all right here.

Savory scones also have a place at the top of my favorite things, as in the first course. But, the “dessert” scone is my preference every time. Morning, noon or night, scones always fit in. Just add tea.

image

First and foremost, thanks to Peanut Butter & Julie {clever name} for this fantastic recipe I adapted.  Of course I was drawn in right from the get~go.  The name seems simple; “Southern”, that almost always denotes something delicious.  “Pecan” always equals crunchy and yummy.  “Praline”, that’s got to be great, it’s sweet candy and I love candy in all forms.  And finally, “Scones” ~ ooh scones.  I do not need to know anything else but when are they done?    As an aside, I liked the praline so much I doubled the recipe to add to my upcoming Chocolate Salami.  That’s just a teaser.

I really enjoyed making these, especially since they are the flagship of “Scone Sunday”, my new project.  I can’t very well have a website called The Queen of Scones without living up to certain expectations, which led me directly to Scone Sunday.  The plan is to offer at least one scone recipe each week.  Sometimes sweet, sometimes savory but always a bit of Heaven in your hand.

Once I get more proficient and properly established (a finished website for instance.  Please forgive the “under construction” mode, I’m afraid I’ll be here for awhile).   There’s much more technical computer knowledge needed than I thought, quite a lot more than I have.  I hope to generate enough income to pay for necessary upgrades and a web designer; buts that’s pretty far off in the future I’m afraid.  So for now, I’ll just muddle through and do the best I can.  May I request your patience as I sort things out like why I have Twitter highlighted 3 different times.  I know just one would be sufficient.  Blazingly loud  bugs to sort out.  Hmmmph!

By the way, what do you think of my logo,  Sassy the “Queen Bee”?  I love her, she has enough attitude to make her interesting but cute enough to see her all over my website.  So I say, let’s get to it.

SOUTHERN PECAN PRALINE SCONES
Print Recipe
10 ~ 12 large or 2 dozen petite scones that will tantalize your tastebuds. In my opinion, there isn't much out there to equal the delight of a well~made scone. No doubt, these fit the bill to a "T". Light, flakey, sweet, all I aim for in my scone and it's all right here. Savory scones also have a place at the top of my favorite things, as in the first course. But, the "dessert" scone is my preference every time. Morning, noon or night, scones always fit in. Just add tea.
Servings Prep Time
1~ 2 Dozen 60 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20 ~ 25 Minutes 45 Minutes Cooling time for the pralines
Servings Prep Time
1~ 2 Dozen 60 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20 ~ 25 Minutes 45 Minutes Cooling time for the pralines
SOUTHERN PECAN PRALINE SCONES
Print Recipe
10 ~ 12 large or 2 dozen petite scones that will tantalize your tastebuds. In my opinion, there isn't much out there to equal the delight of a well~made scone. No doubt, these fit the bill to a "T". Light, flakey, sweet, all I aim for in my scone and it's all right here. Savory scones also have a place at the top of my favorite things, as in the first course. But, the "dessert" scone is my preference every time. Morning, noon or night, scones always fit in. Just add tea.
Servings Prep Time
1~ 2 Dozen 60 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20 ~ 25 Minutes 45 Minutes Cooling time for the pralines
Servings Prep Time
1~ 2 Dozen 60 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20 ~ 25 Minutes 45 Minutes Cooling time for the pralines
Ingredients
For the Pralines
For the Scones
Servings: Dozen
Instructions
Pecan Pralines
  1. Prepare the pecan pralines: In a medium saucepan, combine the brown sugar, milk, butter, vanilla, cinnamon, and salt. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium heat, stirring constantly so the sugar dissolves. Add the chopped pecans to the mixture and continue to boil for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Drop the mixture by heaping tablespoonsful onto parchment-lined baking sheets; allow to cool completely. When the pralines have hardened, break into small chunks or roughly chop.
Scones
  1. Preheat the oven to 375F degrees. Place oven racks in the upper and lower third positions of the oven.
  2. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in your food processor. Pulse to combine. Scatter the butter pieces over the flour mixture and pulse several times until the mixture resembles coarse meal. I ended up doing this by hand and I believe it worked better than the stand mixer.
  3. Transfer the mixture to a large bowl and stir in the chopped praline pieces. {we sampled a few just to be sure they were okay}. Add the buttermilk, mixing until just combined. If the scone dough is too dry after adding the buttermilk, then add a few tablespoons more. The dough should be evenly moist, but not overly sticky and wet.
  4. Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface and gently knead a few times to bring the dough together. Be careful not to overwork the dough.
  5. Divide the dough in half and pat it into two rounds, about 1-inch thick. Cut each round into 6 wedges and place the wedges on the prepared baking sheets.
  6. Brush the tops of the scones with the egg wash. Bake the scones for 20-25 minutes, rotating positions halfway through the baking process, until they are golden brown and a toothpick inserted into the center emerges clean.
  7. Because the praline pieces can melt a bit while the scones are baking, some of them may seep around the bottom edges. If this area starts to burn, you can either remove it with a knife or a spoon, or you can tent the scones loosely with foil for the remainder of the baking period. I wanted to refrigerate the scones awhile before baking to help eliminate the problem but was rushed as we're celebrating Mr. Bee's Mother's 89th birthday and I wanted to take her one. Fortunately, the melting bits were not an issue. The are LARGE scones. Feel free to cut them in half to yield 2 dozen.
  8. This scones dough can be prepared 1 day in advance and refrigerated, tightly wrapped.
  9. You can also pre-cut the scone shapes and freeze them. Thaw in the refrigerator overnight and bake as directed.
  10. Fully baked scones can also be frozen, tightly wrapped, for up to one week. Thaw at room temperature and reheat. 💜
  11. Side Note: I want to issue a clear warning here, the praline burns ALOT so be cautious. I know cooked sugar is especially hot but from very recent personal experience {that's gonna blister} be very careful dropping the hot pralines onto the parchment.
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CARIBBEAN RUM CAKE

Mr. Bee just had a momentous birthday but declined a big party. Me, on the other hand would like a big party every birthday. He agreed to a small gathering with just our son and his family so I really wanted to at least make an epic cake. If it doesn’t turn out well I’ll still post it . . . On Pinterest fails. Keep a good thought for my success.

He is an avid “Game of Thrones” fan so when I found a dragon cake pan, both my heart and mind were set on it immediately.

This pan holds 10 – 12 cups, 2 complete recipes with no extra batter. I wanted to play around a little on the decorating. I’m seriously thinking of making up a mix cake just so I can practice a bit. What the heck am I going to do with all that cake! I was able to level off the bottom which gave me a “practice” cake.

CARIBBEAN RUM CAKE
Print Recipe
This is no ordinary Bundt cake. The very decorative cake pan requires two full cake recipes, needs a time adjustment and a lot of patience. While it's not the epic cake I had in mind, it turned out pretty well, tastes great and I'm sure the family will love it.
Servings Prep Time
1 Bundt 30-40 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
55-60 minutes 12 Hours
Servings Prep Time
1 Bundt 30-40 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
55-60 minutes 12 Hours
CARIBBEAN RUM CAKE
Print Recipe
This is no ordinary Bundt cake. The very decorative cake pan requires two full cake recipes, needs a time adjustment and a lot of patience. While it's not the epic cake I had in mind, it turned out pretty well, tastes great and I'm sure the family will love it.
Servings Prep Time
1 Bundt 30-40 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
55-60 minutes 12 Hours
Servings Prep Time
1 Bundt 30-40 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
55-60 minutes 12 Hours
Ingredients
Servings: Bundt
Instructions
For the Cake
  1. Preheat oven to 325ºF. Spritz a 10 to 12 cup Bundt pan with baking spray. Sprinkle on the pecan or almond flour and turn the pan to coat evenly. Set aside.
  2. Place all of the cake ingredients except the rum, vanilla and rum flavoring in the bowl of your stand mixer and blend on medium for 2 minutes. Be sure to scrape the bowl down after one minute. Mr. Bee got me a new paddle that helps do this while mixing, No need to scrape it down, it's automatic with my new blade.
  3. Add the rum, vanilla and rum flavoring, if using, to the batter and blend for another minute. Pour the batter into the prepared Bundt cake pan and spread level with a spatula.
  4. In order to make the dragon cake I made two identical recipes and added them together to the stand mixer and mixed till I felt satisfied they were well blended.
  5. The original cooking time was not nearly long enough. I kept it in the oven, turning it 1/4 turn every 30 minutes. The final cooking time for this "double" cake was about 110 minutes. It rose ALOT!
  6. When done, the cake will test clean on a cake tester. Bundt cakes are difficult to test properly with a toothpick. Instead, try a piece of dry uncooked spaghetti or linguini. I have a special cake tester I got on Etsy and I love it! He's my little bear with a big heart and he even has a backpack.
  7. Leave the cake in the pan to cool slightly while you make the soaking syrup.
Soaking Syrup
  1. In a medium-sized saucepan combine all of the syrup ingredients, except the vanilla. Bring to a rapid boil then reduce to a simmer and cook for eight to ten minutes, until the syrup thickens slightly. Remove from the heat and add the vanilla. If you double the cake as I did, make sure to double the syrup also. {Theoretically, but I found 1 recipe of the syrup is ample}.
  2. Use a long skewer to poke holes all over the cake. Pour about 1/4 of the syrup over the cake while still in the pan. Allow the syrup to soak in then repeat again and again until all the syrup is used.
  3. Cover the pan loosely and allow the cake to sit out overnight to cool completely and soak in the syrup. When ready to serve, loosen the edges of the cake and invert to your serving plate.
  4. Serve with coffee or tea . The cake is very moist, fragrant and potent. The yield is one large or two small Bundt cakes. Luckily, this cake freezes well.
  5. In the final process, I did not keep pouring the syrup on. I gave it One~fourth of the syrup and kept the rest for later. I did not want a soppy, soggy cake but I did brush the completed cake with the remaining syrup. Then I added gold glitter over all of the cake, mixed up the luster dust for the eggs and finally, I brushed a liquid gold glaze over the back, wings and face to highlight those features. While ultimately not a perfect replica of the idea in my mind but it's really very nice and the flavoring . . . Fabulous. The cake mold worked well and the cake released easily.
Recipe Notes

In the final process, I did not keep pouring the syrup on. I used One~fourth of the syrup and kept the rest for later. I did not want a soppy, soggy cake but I did brush the completed cake with the remaining syrup. Then I added gold glitter over all of the cake, mixed up the luster dust for the eggs and finally, I brushed a liquid gold glaze over the back, wings and face to highlight those features.
Ultimately, not a perfect replica of the idea in my mind but it's really very nice and the flavoring . . . Fabulous. The cake mold worked well and the cake released easily.

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