Heath Bits O` Brickel Bundt Cake #BundtBakers

First things first.  I set up my website originally as best I could, knowing very little about WordPress, and nothing about websites.  It was just barely functional, but it was the best I could do.  I asked on Facebook about finding help to make it better.  Tammy Pappas stepped up and tried to “fix” it.  She was able to diagnose the problems after many hours of her time and trouble.  She ultimately told me I needed to find a well-versed designer to fix all the mess I made (she said it it nicer than that).  She said she would try to find someone to help me but I was afraid they would want too much money. I’d seen designers advertising their services for amounts in the thousands.  I was very upset and I was ready to chuck it all in spite of the fact that my site it’s one of the highlights in my life.

Then, fortunately, Tammy referred me to Kemory Grubb of WYZ Designs.  This young man was Heaven~sent.  I’m sure, if you’ve visited my site before you can see that a major overhaul has taken place.  This guy not only knows his stuff, he’s actually reasonable.  If I can afford him, so can you, if you need any assistance.  These comments are completely my own idea, not prompted by any requests and I hope I haven’t broken any rules.

I’m so very thankful to Tammy for all her time and trouble being so kind to offer her assistance.  She is very knowledgeable and diagnosed my problems and offered solutions.  I’m so grateful to both Tammy and Kemory for not only “saving my site” but fixing it to the point of looking and functioning in a professional manner.  It looks great, don’t you think?  And I didn’t lose Sassy The Bee which was extremely im[ortant to me.  My granddaughter created her for me and I love her.

And now, back to business:

#BundtBakers is a group of Bundt loving bakers who get together once a month to bake Bundts with a common ingredient or theme. You can see all our of lovely Bundts by following our cakes <ahref=”http: www.pinterest.com=”” flpl=”” bundtbakers=”” “=””>Pinterest board. We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient.
</ahref=”http:>

Updated links for all of our past events and more information about BundtBakers, can be found on our <a href=”http://www.foodlustpeoplelove.com/p/bundtbakers.html”>home page</a>.

If you are a food blogger and would like to join us, just send an email to Stacy at foodlustpeoplelove@gmail.com or ask to join our private Facebook group. https://www.facebook.com/groups/232682126893174 This is a purely administrative group. All recipes and photographs can be found on our individual blogs or our Pinterest board.

Our theme for the New Year is “Favorite Bundt Cakes”.  Wow!  I enjoy Bundt Cakes especially, for no particular reason. and so far, I’ve really enjoyed every Bundt cake made since joining #BundtBakers; so it took a little while to think about.

Then, I remembered that a few years ago Mr B and myself made a Heath Bar Chocolate Layer Cake to take to a family function.  I think it was the first time we ever baked together.  I recall there were many steps and instruction.  We let the cakes cool overnight and made the filling and topping and put it together in time for our family gathering later that day.

It absolutely disappeared before my eyes.  Some of the folks were going back for seconds, before first servings were completed.  The family raved on about how delicious it was and for some, it was the first cake from scratch they ever had.   Naturally, I have no idea where that recipe is.

I decided to seek out another Heath Bar awesome cake, in Bundt form.  I spent the better part of an afternoon looking up recipes and though I found a good number of cakes that included Heath Bars, nothing set off any alarms.  Until, I ran  across this recipe from Genius Kitchen http://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/brickle-bundt-cake-242954?ic1=recentlyviewed It’s modified only slightly.  If it’s already perfect, why mess with it.  I love this cake. It includes many of my favorite desert ingredients.

I find it interesting where this cake came from originally,  “this cake comes from Hershey’s Kitchens and it promises to be a winner!  Update: 09/07/2007 The cake is a real winner! It tastes really awesome – it stays moist, almost like a pound cake, stores well and the brickle part is lovely! “

I agree completely.  It is a real winner in every aspect.  It includes ingredients that most bakers  have in their pantry.  If you need anything additionally, it doesn’t require any specialty stores or online purchases.  There it is,!simple but fantasmigorical!

I would like to thank Lidia from Nunca es Demasiado.  Lidia, your theme is inspiring and a wonderful way to begin the year by preparing a favorite cake.  Lídia is supported by very  knowledgeable and talented ladies who generously offer their talents each month.

Heath Bits O` Brickel Bundt Cake
Print Recipe
I’ve been looking forward to making this cake for awhile now. It looked simple and straitforward, and it is. No complicated instruction, most of the ingredients are probably in your pantry and the rest are easily attainable at your local market, on the baking aisle.
Servings Prep Time
10 Servings 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 ~ 50 Minutes 10 Minutes cooling
Servings Prep Time
10 Servings 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 ~ 50 Minutes 10 Minutes cooling
Heath Bits O` Brickel Bundt Cake
Print Recipe
I’ve been looking forward to making this cake for awhile now. It looked simple and straitforward, and it is. No complicated instruction, most of the ingredients are probably in your pantry and the rest are easily attainable at your local market, on the baking aisle.
Servings Prep Time
10 Servings 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 ~ 50 Minutes 10 Minutes cooling
Servings Prep Time
10 Servings 45 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 ~ 50 Minutes 10 Minutes cooling
Ingredients
Bundt Cake
Glaze
Servings: Servings
Instructions
Bundt Cake
  1. Preheat oven to 350ºF. Prepare your Bundt pan by liberally applying cake release, either homemade or purchased.
  2. Set aside 1/4 cup toffee bits for topping. See below, Sassy Bee is tattling on me.
  3. Combine remaining toffee bits, 1/2 cup sugar, walnuts and cinnamon; set aside.
  4. Beat the remaining 1 cup of sugar and 1/2 cup butter in your Kitchenaid mixer bowl and blend until it looks light fluffy.
  5. Add eggs one at a time, add vanilla; beat well.
  6. Whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt, Set aside. When the sugar and butter are well combined, gradually add to butter mixture, alternately with sour cream, beating until well blended. Beat about 5 minutes
  7. Sassy the Bee wants you to know that while documenting the stages of the cake, I inadvertently clicked on something that resulted in a black screen. Im certain that that no one will have any problems following the recipe and successfully bringing it all together.
  8. Spoon 1/3 of batter into prepared pan.
  9. Sprinkle with half of toffee mixture. Spoon half of remaining batter into pan and top with remaining toffee mixture. Spoon remaining batter into pan. Pour melted butter over batter.
  10. Bake 45-50 minutes or until wooden pick inserted in center comes out with just a few moist crumbs or test with your bundt cake thermometer. The instructions are very easy to follow and I’m certain none of you will have a problem. I would consider this cake appropriate for a beginner, if they know how to follow a recipe. It really is that simple.
  11. Cool 10 minutes; remove from pan to wire rack and cool completely.
Glaze
  1. Combine all ingredients and mix until you reach a drizzling consistency. Drizzle over cooled cake
  2. Sprinkle the remaining 1/4 cup toffee bits over the top of the cake. Serve and enjoy! That’s the easy part.
  3. I think that next time I make it, I’ll double the amount of batter. The cake was rather small. I probably should have used a smaller Bundt pan but, I still think the way to go is to simply double the ingredients for the cake itself. More bits and nuts might be necessary too, oh heck, just double the whole fabulous recipe. Thanks a lot Genius Kitchen. I love your recipe.
  4. I enjoyed the last piece of cake a week later and although it was starting to get a bit dry, the flavors remained bright and tasty.
  5. Be sure to see what all our other bakers have made up for this event. There are some really incredible cakes to enjoy.
Recipe Notes

 A Bundt cake /bʌnt/ is a cake that is baked in a Bundt pan, shaping it into a distinctive ring shape. The shape is inspired by a traditional European cake known as Gugelhupf, but Bundt cakes are not generally associated with any single recipe. The style of mold in North America was popularized in the 1950s and 1960s, after cookware manufacturer Nordic Ware trademarked the name "Bundt" and began producing Bundt pans from cast aluminum. Publicity from Pillsbury saw the cakes gain widespread popularity.

The Bundt cake derives in part from a European brioche-like cake called Gugelhupf which was particularly popular among Jewish communities in parts of Germany, Austria, and Poland. In the north of Germany Gugelhupf is traditionally known as Bundkuchen (German pronunciation: [ˈbʊntkuːxn̩]), a name formed by joining the two words Bund and Kuchen (cake).

Opinions differ as to the significance of the word Bund. One possibility is that it means "bunch" or "bundle", and refers to the way the dough is bundled around the tubed center of the pan. It is interesting to note in this respect that in Dutch, the cake is called "tulband," which is Dutch for 'turban.' The pronunciation of the second part of this word is very similar to that of 'bundt.' Another source suggests that it describes the banded appearance given to the cake by the fluted sides of the pan, similar to a tied sheaf or bundle of wheat. Some authors have suggested that Bund instead refers to a group of people, and that Bundkuchen is so called because of its suitability for parties and gatherings.

Uses of the word bund outside of Europe to describe cakes can be found in Jewish-American cookbooks from around the start of the 20th century. The alternative spelling "bundte" also appears in a recipe as early as 1901.

Bundt-style pans in silicone and metal:
Bundt cakes do not conform to any single recipe; instead, their characterizing feature is their shape. A Bundt pan generally has fluted or grooved sides, but its most defining design element is the central tube or "chimney" which leaves a cylindrical hole through the center of the cake. The design means that more of the mixture touches the surface of the pan than in a simple round pan, helping to provide faster and more even heat distribution during cooking. The shape is similar to that of the earlier European Gugelhupf or Bundkuchen. A Gugelhupf differs from contemporary Bundt-style cakes in that it follows a particular yeast-based recipe, with fruit and nuts, and is often deeper in shape and more decorative. Also similar in shape is the Eastern European Babka, dating from early 18th century Poland.

Today, there is no recipe for "Bundt cake". Anything can be baked in a Bundt-style pan, and is. Recipes range from Pine Nut and Chili cakes to ice cream and fruit concoctions. And, Bundt-style pan design has expanded beyond the original fluted ring to today's designs of skylines and cathedrals, all with the requisite hole in the center of the pan made by Nordic Ware and others. Since a toroidal cake is rather difficult to frost, Bundt cakes are typically either dusted with powdered sugar, drizzle-glazed, or served undecorated. Recipes specifically designed for Bundt pans often have a baked-in filling; Bundt pound cakes are also common.

Since the name "Bundt" is a trademark, similar pans are often sold as "fluted tube pans" or given other similar descriptive titles. The trademark holder Nordic Ware only produces Bundt pans in aluminum, but similar fluted pans are available in other materials.

The people credited with popularizing the Bundt cake are American businessman H. David Dalquist and his brother Mark S. Dalquist, who co-founded cookware company Nordic Ware based in St. Louis Park, Minnesota. In the late 1940s, Rose Joshua and Fannie Schanfield, friends and members of the Minneapolis Jewish-American Hadassah Society approached Dalquist asking if he could produce a modern version of a traditional cast iron Gugelhupf dish. Dalquist and company engineer Don Nygren designed a cast aluminum version which Nordic Ware then made a small production run of in 1950. In order to successfully trademark the pans, a "t" was added to the word "Bund". A number of the original Bundt pans now reside in the Smithsonian collection.

Initially, the Bundt pan sold so poorly that Nordic Ware considered discontinuing it. The product received a boost when it was mentioned in the New Good Housekeeping Cookbook in 1963, but did not gain real popularity until 1966, when a Bundt cake called the "Tunnel of Fudge", baked by Ella Helfrich, took second place at the annual Pillsbury Bake-Off and won its baker $5,000. The resulting publicity resulted in more than 200,000 requests to Pillsbury for Bundt pans and soon led to the Bundt pan surpassing the tin Jell-O mold as the most-sold pan in the United States. In the 1970s, Pillsbury licensed the name Bundt from Nordic Ware and for a while sold a range of Bundt cake mixes.

To date, more than 60 million Bundt pans have been sold by Nordic Ware across North America and

November 15 has been officially declared as "National Bundt Day".

~~~Wikipedia ~~~

Be sure to check out the recipes from the other bakers.  The entries are varied and delicious.  Some really incredible desserts are just waiting to be sampled by your family.

i just enjoyed the last piece of this month’s cake with my evening cup of tea.  Although it became somewhat dry after one week, the flavor was still spectacular. Everyone lucky enough to enjoy a serving, reported nothing but praise for the flavor, texture, and appearance. Oh yeah! I’m already planning when I can make it again. I need some special event or gathering, which will be greatly enhanced with this cake on the dessert menu.

I didn’t try the baker’s tip of placing a slice of bread against the cut edges to help retain the moisture but you can bet that I will give it a try on my next Bundt Cake

Leave us a Message