National Bundt Cake Day ~ Amarula Bundt Cake

THE AFRICAN LEGEND
Storytelling has always been central to African life. The Marula tree, as the source of several fascinating legends, has become a sacred and intricate part of ancient African culture. Locals have revered these trees for centuries and refer to them fondly by various names.

Because elephants travel for miles to feast on the wild fruit, locals call it ‘The Elephant Tree’. African folklore also refers to it as ‘The Marriage Tree’. Apart from making a beautifully natural wedding canopy, it’s also said to have aphrodisiac properties and features in tribal fertility rites. The ripening of the Marula fruit in summer coincides with great celebrations in many parts of Southern Africa. In Swaziland, for example, the annual Marula Festival is celebrated at the king’s royal residence, sustaining the belief that the Marula fruit is fit for kings and queens.

Like the elephants, the Marula trees are protected under South African law. They are a key part of African heritage and may not be farmed for commerce. The fruit however is sold in a variety of natural products, Amarula of course being one of them.

NATIONAL BUNDT CAKE DAY ~ AMARULA BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
This cake is moist, has a tender crumb and a unique, almost addicting flavor. I knew I had to make it from the get go. It drew me in right from the start. After all was said and done, I was not disappointed and will surely make this again, for a special occasion.
Servings
8 ~ 10 Servings
Cook Time Passive Time
50 ~ 60 Minutes 4 Hours
Servings
8 ~ 10 Servings
Cook Time Passive Time
50 ~ 60 Minutes 4 Hours
NATIONAL BUNDT CAKE DAY ~ AMARULA BUNDT CAKE
Print Recipe
This cake is moist, has a tender crumb and a unique, almost addicting flavor. I knew I had to make it from the get go. It drew me in right from the start. After all was said and done, I was not disappointed and will surely make this again, for a special occasion.
Servings
8 ~ 10 Servings
Cook Time Passive Time
50 ~ 60 Minutes 4 Hours
Servings
8 ~ 10 Servings
Cook Time Passive Time
50 ~ 60 Minutes 4 Hours
Ingredients
THE BUNDT CAKE
GANACHE & ASSEMBLY
Servings: Servings
Instructions
BUNDT CAKE
  1. Pre~heat oven to 350ºF and prepare a medium Bundt pan with cake release. My Homemade release has never let me down, no matter how intricate the design.
  2. Sift together, the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in a large mixing bowl. Whisk to combine.
  3. In the bowl of your stand mixer, beat together the melted butter, milk, 4 Tablespoons Amarula Liqueur, eggs and caramel essence until light and fluffy.
  4. Add dry ingredients and fold together by hand just until combined. DO NOT OVERMIX
  5. Pour batter into prepared Bundt pan, smooth on top and rap on the counter a few times to release any unwanted bubbles
  6. Bake in pre~heated oven for 50 to 60 minutes or until a finger pressed on the top of the cake springs right back up; and a tester comes out with just a few moist crumbs.
  7. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack 5 to 10 minutes
  8. Un~mold Bundt cake onto a wire rack with parchment or waxed paper underneath to catch any dripping.
  9. Using a skewer, pierce the cake in several places over the top of the cake. Heat 4 Tablespoons heavy whipping cream and 2 Tablespoons Amarula Liqueur just until warm ~ slowly pour over the cake and allow to cool completely.
GANACHE AND ASSEMBLY
  1. Once the cake has completely cooled, Combine the chopped milk chocolate, 1 Tablespoon heavy whipping cream and 2 Tablespoons Amarula Liqueur in a microwave~safe bowl. Heat in microwave on 75% power in 20 second intervals, stirring in between until completely smooth and melted. Pour over cake, followed by sprinkling the chopped pecans over the top of the cake; and dust with icing sugar, if desired.
Recipe Notes

Total  Trivia:

The United States has over 175 days related to awareness of food or drink.  None of these are federal holidays.

THE AFRICAN LEGEND
Storytelling has always been central to African life. The Marula tree, as the source of several fascinating legends, has become a sacred and intricate part of ancient African culture. Locals have revered these trees for centuries and refer to them fondly by various names.

Because elephants travel for miles to feast on the wild fruit, locals call it ‘The Elephant Tree’. African folklore also refers to it as ‘The Marriage Tree’. Apart from making a beautifully natural wedding canopy, it’s also said to have aphrodisiac properties and features in tribal fertility rites. The ripening of the Marula fruit in summer coincides with great celebrations in many parts of Southern Africa. In Swaziland, for example, the annual Marula Festival is celebrated at the king’s royal residence, sustaining the belief that the Marula fruit is fit for kings and queens.

Like the elephants, the Marula trees are protected under South African law. They are a key part of African heritage and may not be farmed for commerce. The fruit however is sold in a variety of natural products, Amarula of course being one of them.

Amarula {my new obsession} is a cream liqueur from South Africa. It is made with sugar, cream and the fruit of the African marula tree (Sclerocarya birrea) which is also locally called the Elephant tree or the Marriage Tree. It has an alcohol content of 17% by volume. It has had some success at international spirit ratings competitions, winning a gold medal at the 2006 San Francisco World Spirits Competition.

History:

Amarula was first marketed by Southern Liqueur Company of South Africa (the current trademark owners and wholly owned subsidiary of Distell Group Limited) as a liqueur in September 1989, the Amarula spirit having been launched in 1983.  It has the taste of slightly fruity caramel.

Distribution:

Amarula has had particular success in Brazil [and in Chandler, Arizona ] just kidding {not really}. Recently, Amarula has attempted to break into the American market.

Elephant-associated marketing:

Elephants enjoy eating the fruit of the marula tree. Because of the marula tree's association with elephants, the distiller has made them its symbol and supports elephant conservation efforts, co-funding the Amarula Elephant Research Programme at the University of Natal, Durban.   For marketing efforts it produces elephant-themed collectible items.

Just once a year, the Marula trees bear fruit. The elephants are drawn by the exotic scent and travel for miles to get a taste. That’s when we know it’s time to hand-harvest the ripe, yellow fruit and begin the two-year process that brings the unique taste of Amarula to the world.  The elephants get a little drunk from it and once you try it, you’ll see for yourself why they travel so far to enjoy it to the fullest.  There are videos of the elephants consuming the fruit and staggering around in a bit of drunken stupor.  None have been “carded” to my knowledge.

~ ~ ~ WIKIPEDIA {mostly} ??

* use any Cream Liqueur if Amarula is unavailable. I had to special order mine and picked it up the next day. According to the internet, it was only available by order and the one store had just a few bottles in stock kept in the back.  Now that I have tasted it, and really enjoyed it, I hope to expand my number of Amarula recipes.  Apparently, it can be used in lots of different recipes.  I’m going to do a little R & D of my own to develop a new recipe using this delightful cream liqueur.  Look for it in the upcoming weeks.

Well, got her mixed and in the oven.  This cake is quite simple to pull together and tasting the batter, I can’t wait to dive in.  As an aside, caramel essence tastes about as good as vanilla right out of the bottle.  I’m certain it will do the desired job on the final cake flavor though.

adapted. Fromwww. withablast.net

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