Rose and Lavender Simple Syrup

 Simple Syrup:

Lavender Simple Syrup

Ingredients:

1 cup distilled water
1/2 cup simple sugar
1 tablespoon dried lavender

Directions:

Bring to a boil water, sugar and lavender, stirring occasionally. Once at a boil, bring to a simmer for 2 minutes. Strain through a fine sieve and let cool. Will keep for several weeks in the refrigerator if well-sealed.

This one is from Martha Stewart

Lavender Simple Syrup

Ingredients:

1 cup distilled water
1 cup superfine sugar
3 Tbsp lavender buds, rinsed (remove the buds from the stems before they flower)
tiny touch of violet gel food coloring (optional)

Directions:

In a small saucepan heat the water, sugar, and lavender until it comes to a simmer, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Simmer gently for 5 minutes. Depending on the color of your lavender, you may or may not get a pale lavender shade to your syrup. If you want to bump up the color, add a TINY bit of gel paste food coloring. (use a toothpick)
Let cool and then strain through cheesecloth into a jar or bottle with a tight fitting lid.
Refrigerate until ready to use. It will keep for a month in the fridge.

Rose Simple Syrup

Ingredients:

1 cup distilled water
1/2 cup Rose Water (food grade, not the kind for cosmetic use)
1 cup superfine sugar
1 heaping cup rose petals, rinsed (the darker your petals, the more color you will get) Be certain they are free of insecticides or other “garden sprays”

Directions:

Heat the water, rose water, sugar and rose petals in a small saucepan until it comes to a simmer, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Simmer gently for 5 minutes.
Let the liquid cool, then strain into a jar or bottle with a tight fitting lid.
Refrigerate until ready to use. It will keep for a month.

Experimenting with simple syrups can be fun, produce a very pretty result that makes attractive and useful gifts.  Just get some pretty little bottles from your favorite hobby store.  Wash well and sterilize before adding the strained syrup.  For gifting, I think I’d add a small spray of the flowers tied on with a bit of raffia.  Very pretty little gift.

When we lived in Southern California, I used to keep a large variety of flavorful geraniums, many kinds of mint along with my other herbs.  All of the edible variety could be used and produce some interesting results.  One that sticks out for some reason is chocolate mint.  Imagine a few drops of that in a tasty ganache.  My favorite though was an entire corner of several varieties of lavender.  My sweet Abby, a gorgeous calico loved to climb in among the flowers and bury herself up to the point that if you looked really hard, you “might” find her pretty little face.

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Back to business.  The basic recipe is a 1 to 1 sugar and water ratio, but you can make a thinner syrup by simply adding more water.  Heat the two in a small saucepan until the sugar dissolves. The more flavoring agent you use, and the longer you let it steep, the stronger it will be. It will keep for about a month If kept refrigerated.  While simple syrups are most often used in drinks, adding a bit of an exotic flavor if not overdone; they can also be used to add a striking touch of subtlety in desserts, cakes, delicate cookies, frosting, icing and glazes.  Just about anywhere a little could add a lot!

Caution:  Be sure your simple syrup is kept refrigerated.  It has a shelf~life of about a month.

adapted from The View from Great Island

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